Planting a Vegetable Garden at your Muskoka Home

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We all know that fresh produce is the best kind and locally grown is a wonderful way to get it. How local do you want? How about home grown! Planting and growing your own vegetables is good for your body and your mind.  It will not only provide great fresh food for your family but while working in your garden you get exercise and reduce stress.

If you are new to vegetable gardening, it’s not difficult. Here are a few important things you should consider.  A little planning before you start to dig will save frustration and give you a better chance of success.

The right location

A good vegetable garden should be in a spot that gets plenty of sun, about six to eight hours each day. To figure out the sunny spot watch the sun and shade patterns in your yard on a bright day. This will guide you to the best location. The sun is highest in the sky in late June, so early in the year, like now, the days might be a bit shadier. Choose a level place as gardening on a hill is much more challenging, however if you need to, you can create terraces.

Size matters

Do not be too ambitious your first year. Keep your small garden as it will be easier to manage. You can always make it bigger next year. A 10’ x 10’ space can produce a good amount of fresh and tasty produce if it is well managed. Rows can be anywhere from 2’ to 4’ feet wide.  Remember that wide rows will need to have paths on both sides.

Prepare your soil

The earth you plant in is undoubtedly the most important ingredient in successful vegetable garden.  You should till or break up the top soil (your existing soil) at least eight inches deep, if not more. Once you have this layer all well cleared of weeds and aerated it is time to fortify it.  Get some compost  (the District of Muskoka offers it free each year) or you can buy it from a garden supply centre. You can also use a manure or a similar soil amendment with organic matter also available from your local landscape or garden centre. Mix thoroughly with your existing soil at a bout a 40% compost to 60% soil ratio. If you are building raised beds, you may need to buy some additional topsoil.

Choosing what to plant

The region of Ontario has a comparatively short growing season. You can plant cool weather veggies such as peas, spinach, broccoli and kale starting in late April or early May. Start lettuce in early to mid May. Warm weather plants like tomatoes, beans, peppers and squash can be planted in June. Though seeds are the most economical way to plant, for tomatoes, peppers and broccoli, it is best to buy small sets of seedlings from a garden centre.

For a small garden plot, choose compact varieties of plants. Bush beans and peas will be a better choice than vines. Some vegetable varieties are ready for harvest faster than others; pick the quick growing varieties if you can. You should be able to plant a second round of cool season vegetables in August.

After planting

Moisture is the key. A good mulch layer and water are the final ingredients. The mulch helps to keep the soil moist while adding organic matter to your soil over time. Seeds will need frequent water and moist soil to germinate. You can cut back on watering frequency as plants get larger, however water thoroughly so that more than the surface layer of soil gets wet.

The planting dates suggested here are approximate and a long Muskoka winter followed by a very wet early spring will require oblivious adjustments. A surprise late frost or an early summer can change things too for better or for worse! That is part of the fun of vegetable gardening. Don’t loose heart as when one crop has a bad year, another may do well. You never know exactly what to expect, but with good soil, water and some determination, you’ll be enjoying fresh vegetables grown at your Muskoka home throughout the summer.

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Green Spring Cleaning Your Muskoka Home

Sprin Clean GreenAfter enduring an extra long winter it’s finally time to fling open the windows of your Muskoka home and let in the fresh spring air . It is also time to tackle the dreaded spring cleaning. Conventional cleaning products can be more dangerous than the dirt they’re intended to clean so what are your options? The way we clean (with lots of disposable paper towels) isn’t always earth-friendly either. However, there are many available alternatives that can help you make your home squeaky clean—and green too!

Green Cleaning Products

The last thing you want to do is dump toxic chemicals into our beautiful environment as you clean. These days, you don’t have to make a special trip to a speciality store to seek out environmentally friendly cleaning products. Green Works products available in many stores including Walmart and the Green line from Independent Grocers are just a couple of the many products available that both protect the environment and work as well as the more traditional brands.  Or, if you’re up for a DIY challenge, you can make your own natural homemade cleaners yourself. It’s easier than you might think! The basic supplies you’ll need to make your own green cleaners include:

Distilled white vinegar (sold in most supermarkets)

Baking soda

Olive oil

Borax (sold in a box in the laundry aisle)

Liquid castile soap (a natural soap base made from saponified organic oils of coconut and sunflower. found in most health foods stores)

Essential oils (super concentrated natural plant oils found in health foods stores, usually in the cosmetics section)

Microfiber cleaning cloths

Newspaper

Here are a few basic “recipes” and techniques to get you started:

Glass: Mix 1/4 cup vinegar with one quart of water in a spray bottle. Spray on glass and wipe clean with old newspaper or a lint-free cloth.

Countertops and bathroom tile: Mix two parts vinegar and one-part baking soda with four parts water. Apply with a sponge, scour and wipe away.

Floors: Mix four cups of white distilled vinegar with about a gallon of hot water. If desired, add a few drops of pure peppermint or lemon oil for a pleasant scent. After damp mopping the floors, the smell of vinegar will dissipate quickly, leaving behind only the scent of the oil.

Wood furniture: Mix equal parts lemon juice and olive and oil. Apply a small amount to a cloth and rub onto the furniture in long, even strokes.

Toilet bowl cleaner: Sprinkle a toilet brush with baking soda and scrub away! Occasionally disinfect your toilet by scrubbing with borax instead. Wipe the outside of the toilet with straight vinegar.

Disinfectant: Mix two teaspoons borax, four tablespoons vinegar, three cups hot water and 1/4 teaspoon liquid castile soap. Wipe on with dampened cloth or use a spray bottle. Wipe clean.

Mold and mildew: Wipe with straight vinegar.

Air freshener: Sprinkle essential oil on a cotton ball and stash it in a corner of the room. If you have kids, make sure it’s out of their reach, as essential oils are very strong and could irritate their skin. Lavender is a relaxing scent that is great for bedrooms, while cinnamon, clove and citrus oils are great for the rest of the house. You can stash a few in the car, too—try peppermint, which may help you stay alert.

Green Cleaning Tips

Hang dry your laundry. Drying your clothes in an electric or gas dryer isn’t just hard on your clothes, but it’s also hard on the environment. Don’t stop with natural laundry detergent—to truly stay green, install a clothesline in your backyard. If space (or aesthetics) is an issue, look for a retractable clothesline, which takes up almost no space when not in use. Weather permitting, line-dry your clothes outside to reduce pollution, while also cutting your energy bill, getting more exercise, enjoying the fresh air and extending the life of your clothes. Plus, they’ll smell like a clean breeze (the real kind, not the chemical kind).

  • Add a little greenery. Install a living air filter—houseplants! Some of the most efficient air-cleaning houseplants include spider plants, English ivy, rubber plants and peace lilies. You’ll need 15 to 18 medium-size (six- to eight-inch diameter container) houseplants for the average 1,800-square-foot house. If that sounds like a lot, place a few plants in the room where you spend the most time.
  • De-clutter your wardrobe. Donate gently worn items to charity, where they’ll get a second life, and donate torn and stained items (if they’re made of an absorbent fabric) to your rag collection, where they’ll replace wasteful paper towels. And as you’re packing up your winter sweaters, replace stinky mothballs with a natural and better-smelling version: Stuff a lonely unpaired sock with cinnamon sticks, bay leaves and whole cloves and tie it at the end.
  • Paint your walls green. If spring cleaning at your house involves a fresh coat of paint, consider the VOC content when choosing your paint. VOCs, or Volatile Organic Compounds, are chemicals that form vapors at room temperature. Some VOCs, like the ones in many paints, contribute to smog and indoor air pollution, and can cause a host of short- and long-term health problems. The good news is that many paint manufacturers have started making low- or no-VOC paints. The bad news is that many of those manufacturers have simply substituted VOCs with other non-VOC (yet still toxic) chemicals. For truly eco-conscious safe paint, check out these products: Homestead House Paint Co., Benjamin Moore Natura and Sherwin Williams Harmony.
  • Swap out your Swiffer. Instead of continually buying expensive single-use mop pads, invest in a reusable mop or cloth head. There are many brands available and Walmart even has some that will fit over an existing Swiffer type mop. These mop heads can be washed in your washing machine, hung dry and used again and again—well worth their moderate price tag.
  • Stop using paper towels. Save trees, cash and landfill waste when you buy specially-made, washable cleaning and dusting cloths, available in all types of fabrics, from cotton to microfiber. Better yet, use what you already have and give an old piece of cloth (stained towels, ratty sheets and pillowcases, too-small t-shirts, etc.) a new life. Simply cut or tear your old item into smaller squares (if you want to get fancy, finish the edges with a sewing machine), and voila! Pop them in the washing machine with your laundry to clean and use them again and again.

Cleaning up your Muskoka home for spring doesn’t have to be dirty work. By implementing some of these ideas and products, you will benefit your body, your home and the planet. Many of these changes are small ones, but their impact on your health and the environment can really add up over time.

 

Buying a Muskoka Fixer-Upper Home Yes or No?

Have you been thinking about buying a Muskoka home to fix up and live in? There is a certain romance to the thought of taking on a home that needs a lot of work and making it yours with your own blood, sweat and tears.  Maybe you’re on the other side and thoughts of Tom Hanks and Shelly Long throwing their money into a “money pit” have you saying “No way, not for me!”.

A traditional fixer-upper is a property that will require significant renovations, reconstruction or redesign to be habitable or saleable at market value. They typically list and sell below the market value of homes of equal size and vintage in similar neighbourhoods.

So, you need to ask yourself if a fixer-upper is a bargain brimming with potential OR should it be avoided like the plague? The answer to this perplexing question will depend on several factors, including you!

One of the best reasons to buy a fixer-up home or cottage is for the location &/or lot. If you are determined to live in a particular part of Muskoka it may mean you have to “snap up” what is available and then fix up the home or cottage to suit your needs.  If the size and structure of the property are right for you, it likely makes more sense to renovate as opposed to a complete demolition and rebuild which can be more time-consuming and in most cases more expensive.

Renovating a fixer-upper is expensive, and you can’t often finance a renovation.  Typically it is not a project for a first-time buyer as usually all available funds are directed to the actual purchase.  Remember that a fixer-upper is a large project, not the usual renovation projects most of us plan to do over time after we move into new home.  So, to tackle a fixer-upper you need to have some capital tucked away to fund the project. Typically, it is a second or third-time home buyer who has a little DIY experience who takes on a fixer-upper home.

A buyer for a fixer-upper is sometimes someone looking for their “forever home” or they may be an investor seeking poorly-maintained properties to fix and flip. In both cases they have usually had several home purchase experiences under their belts and can rely on this to help them through tackling a large project like this.

As a buyer you need to consider your time, money and knowledge when taking on a fixer-upper. Will the time and money involved in fixing up a home or cottage be worth it in the end? If your full-time job is contracting, will the time spent on your own project be as valuable in the end as working on paid contracts?

Be prepared for surprises.  Buyers for this type of property often don’t spend money on a Home Inspection. Without a thorough inspection of the property you could miss costly remediation issues like mold, asbestos, or faulty foundations.

Also be sure to include time for due diligence to explore municipal regulations, zoning and permitting.  And, allow adequate time to carefully cost out the renovation – small things add up. Doing so could save a lot of heart ache or even financial loss.

A final consideration is whether you will need to hire a project manager or do it alone.  Will you hire a contractor for the entire project, or manage contractors and trades for the different jobs yourself? Hiring trades for everything can be a challenge to coordinate if you’ve never done it before especially if you don’t know the local trades people.  And remember, the good ones are often booked several months out.

As a local Realtor with many years of experience I am happy to help you find a perfect project home or cottage.  And, if you have your heart set on a “fixer- upper” with my contacts in the region I may be able to suggest trades people you will need to be successful in your venture.

Renovation Do’s and Don’ts for Your Muskoka Home Resale

Karen Acton - Renovating your Muskoka HomeWhen you decide it’s time to sell your home, you may consider making some changes before listing.  A wise investment of time and money can drastically improve your potential resale value; however, a good plan is vital.

You may believe you are the master of your own renovation, but that may not be the case. Reno’s can develop their own inertia. Things often grind to a halt as each decision can lead to new a dilemma, an unintended consequence or an unexpected outcome. This can result in delays getting listed and missing out on a great market.

Here are a few renovations that I believe make good financial sense, providing a nice return on your investment at the time of resale — and a few that don’t.

Good Resale Value Projects for Muskoka Homes

Kitchens.Updating a tired old kitchen is one of the wisest methods of increasing the value of your home. Keep in mind when planning a kitchen reno, making design decisions, or selecting plumbing fixtures, appliances, cabinets and countertop materials that your choices should appeal to the largest segment of the market and not personal preferences.

Remember, using the existing kitchen layout and affordable cosmetic materials is a sure way to keep the cost of your kitchen reno manageable. When you start tearing out walls, bumping out the exterior home footprint to gain a few feet, and moving plumbing fixtures and appliances, the cost of the job will jump and your return on investment dollars will diminished.

Bathrooms.Home buyers notice bathrooms, and although all the bathrooms are important, a priority should be placed on the master bath, followed by the guest bathroom/powder room and any other secondary bathrooms.

The same rules apply to a bathroom remodel as to the kitchen. Cosmetic changes are safer from an investment standpoint than modifications involving changing layouts. Again keep the permanent pieces neutral so they appeal to a wider audience.

Master suites.As home buying decisions are in the hands of adults, and adults care about the environment where they sleep, updating a master bedroom or remodeling and adding a new master ensuite can be money well spent. Buyers will picture themselves living in their private space especially if they have children living at home or plan to have a family.

Curb appeal.Very often this is the best project for a return on investment. You have heard not to judge a book by its cover, but smart money recognizes the cover’s value. Your front elevation (unless you are on the water) is more than just a first impression. It’s the only impression available to just about all your home’s potential buyers.

The good news is that there are numerous affordable projects that can improve curb appeal. One of the first things buyers look at is the roof.  If it’s in poor condition, it can be perceived as an indication of the overall maintenance of the home. It may cost less to have it done before listing than what you might lose in the negotiating process of an offer.

Repainting is another low-cost, high-impact improvement.  Even a professional cleaning of the exterior siding can make a considerable difference.

Cleaning out overgrown brush and making a few new planting additions to your landscape can go a long way toward improving curb appeal at a very low cost.

Costlier changes such as replacing old windows or an aged entry door are things that potential buyers will notice and value too.

Poor Resale Value

Garages. Adding a garage or insulating an existing one are great ideas, but only if you plan to stay put. Unless you are a great handyman and have access to inexpensive materials and labour, these changes won’t generally pay for themselves if you plan to sell soon.

Pools. Backyard pools are loved by many, and while this appreciation is well founded, they should be constructed for their many virtues that are NOT investment related. Here in Muskoka, it is unlikely to pay for itself in resale value. Many buyers perceive a pool as a negative maintenance expense.

Home theaters/kids’ spaces. No, I am not trying to be the Grinch but there is no assurance your home buyer will be ‘into’ movies or have children living at home. Adding that rock-climbing wall or screens, projectors & speakers might represent unwanted expense to buyers who see this space better used for something more suited to their family.

Removing features.Do not remove features for investment reasons unless they are truly an eyesore or a safety hazard. If you never use the fireplace in your basement, removing it might make perfect sense to you, but the next homeowner might wish it were still there, and the money you spent demolishing and reworking the space will not be reclaimed.

Wine rooms.These are definitely trendy and will almost be expected in large high-end homes however; in a typical Muskoka home they will not add value to the resale.

I am always happy to answer questions and help with recommendations. If you are thinking of reselling your Muakok home and would like some advice on the best ways to improve your resale value, just give me a call!

Legal Cannabis and your Muskoka Home

October 17, 2018 is a big day for many Canadians who have wanted to see the use of recreational marijuana made legal. But what will the impact be on your Muskoka home and its future resale value? Will you choose to legally grow cannabis plants in your home? Will a home you wish to purchase in the future have been used as a “home grow” that may have caused hidden issues? Will being close to a legal commercial “grow op” impact value? Is being close to a retail outlet a pro or a con? These are important questions to think about.

What the New Law Says

  • 4 Cannabis plants may be grown in each residence-includes apartment/condominium units
  • No growth height restrictions
  • Could include outside garden, but may be determined by province but Ontario has made no specification at this time
  • No regulation on safe growing.

Risks to Consider

  • Mould and moisture damage
  • High-voltage lights pose a potential fire hazard

In a CBC interview the Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) said the government’s plan to allow so-called “home grow” could lead to the spread of mould and other fungi in residences across the country — which could result in some costly surprises for home buyers.

“There’s absolutely no question it impacts the value of the home,” Michael Bourque, chief executive officer of CREA, told senators, adding the physical effects of a grow op can often go undetected during a home inspection.

The new law will limit home marijuana growers to four plants per household. The government initially intended to limit plants to 100 centimeters in height, but the House of Commons approved an amendment that removed such a restriction.

“On the surface [four plants] sounds moderate, but the legislation doesn’t limit the number of crops or the size of each plant. Four plants could yield over five kilograms a year, which has the potential to cause structural damage to dwellings and comes with associated health consequences,” Bourque said, noting the use of fertilizers and pesticides in the growing process could exacerbate environmental health risks in a home or a multi-unit dwelling that shares air circulation.

The question of buying a home that has been used to grow cannabis or trying to sell one that has, may be of less significance that the proximity of home to retail and commercial grow facilities. In a recent Zoocasa story this was the data they discovered.

In the journal “Real Estate Economics,” James Conklin and co-authors studied the conversion of medical marijuana stores to recreational marijuana, and the subsequent effect on housing prices in Denver, Colorado after legalization in 2014.

Their research showed that homes located near converted stores experienced appreciation at 8% higher than homes further away.

Realtor.com also reported on American cities having undergone a year of experience with recreational marijuana sales. Their data showed a significant increase in home prices — well above the national median price.

The same data shows that while proximity to a pot shop tends to increase home value, Colorado homes close to grow-ops have lost value. Evidently, the pungent odor of pot is a sticking point for many American buyers.

There is no Canadian data available yet, but it is something for us to watch.

Will it be a “big deal” in the “big picture”?  In a CBC interview Jonathan Page, a botanist who has studied cannabis extensively and serves as the CEO of Anandia Labs, said he doesn’t expect a new flood of grow ops to result from the bill and predicts most Canadians will simply opt to buy the product from a licensed provider.

“I think this is an exaggeration. Canadians can produce their own beer and wine at home, grow tobacco for personal use, and yet the vast majority buy these products from stores,” he said.

No matter what the future holds as a Muskoka home owner you need to be informed. Your choice to grow cannabis while legal may have more ramifications than you think. As a Muskoka Realtor you can rest assured I will be talking to my Sellers about stigmas, defects and disclosure; and ensuring my Buyers conduct independent research into properties they wish to purchase.

For more information about marijuana legalization in Ontario, please refer to the Ontario Governments web site.

 

 

 

Managing your well in a Muskoka Drought

dug_wellIn all areas, including Muskoka, groundwater levels in wells will vary over time.  While we are not experiencing an official drought yet, we are definitely in a “dry spell” and more and more people are starting to have issues with water levels and the quality of water in their wells. Water conservation and pump adjustments can help manage your water well during drought.

Droughts can be stressful for the many Muskoka residents who rely on private wells for their water supply. As wells tap groundwater aquifers that cannot easily be seen or monitored the very invisible nature of groundwater leads to an uneasy feeling among home and cottage owners relying on wells. There is an almost constant fear that their water supply could dry up without warning. 

The Normal Cycle of Groundwater Levels

The water level in a groundwater well will fluctuate naturally during the year. Groundwater levels tend to be highest during March and April in response to winter snowmelt and spring rainfall. The movement of rain and snowmelt into groundwater is known as recharge.

Groundwater levels usually begin to fall in May and continue to decline during the summer. Groundwater recharge is limited during late spring and summer because trees and other plants use the available water to grow. Natural groundwater levels usually reach their lowest point in late September or October. In late fall, after trees and plants have stopped growing and before snow begins to fall, groundwater levels may rise in response to rainfall and recharge. Groundwater recharge persists through the fall until cold temperatures produce snowfall and frozen soil that limit the ability of water to infiltrate into the ground. Groundwater levels during winter may be stable or fall slightly until spring snowmelt and rainstorms start the annual cycle again. Given this natural cycle of groundwater, most problems with wells tend to occur in late summer or early fall when groundwater levels naturally reach their lowest levels.

How Can I Conserve Water?

Water conservation measures become critical during times of drought. If you rely on a private well, you should conserve water as mush as possible always and especially as soon as drought conditions occur.

You can significantly reduce the water use within your cottage or home by making changes in habits and by installing water-saving devices. Examples might include flushing the toilet less often, taking shorter showers, only washing full loads of dishes or laundry, not rinsing dishes before the dishwasher unless especially dirty, not rinsing anything under running water but filling a sink or basin to rinse, brushing teeth with a glass of water and not a running tap, collecting water from roof gutters into rain barrels for outside use. Other good things to implement are household bans on the nonessential use of water such as car washing and lawn watering.  

What Can I Do If My Well Runs Dry?

There are a number of reasons why a well may quit producing water. Water quality problems like iron bacteria and sediment may clog the well and severely restrict water flow and the recovery rate of the well. This becomes more noticeable in dry seasons when there is less ground water available. Shocking or cleaning your well may increase the flow of water however it will not bring back water to a dry well unless the water table comes back up.

Under persistent dry weather conditions, the water level in your well may drop below the submersible pump or intake foot valve, causing a loss of water. In some cases, the water level may only temporarily drop below the pump/intake when water is being frequently drawn from the well during showers or laundry. Under these conditions, you may be able to continue using the well by initiating emergency water conservation measures and using water only for essential purposes.

If the water level permanently drops below the submersible pump or intake, it may be possible to lower the pump/intake within the existing well. In most cases this will only provide a short-term solution to the problem. More permanent solutions require either deepening the existing well or drilling a new well. Be aware that deepening an existing well may not increase the well yield and could produce water of different water quality characteristics. You should consult with a local well driller  to determine the best solution for your situation.

Proper management of private wells during droughts will become more important as competition for water in Muskoka increases.

Can I have water delivered to my well?

The simple answer is of course yes but the honest one is that it is not worth it. A well is a tube not a cistern. It has no bottom so if you put in several hundred gallons of water it will seep out of the bottom until it is gone or reaches the level of the water table. You will only be able to benefit from the water for a brief time before it drains away. Having water delivered to your well is not a fix and much of what you pay for will seep away.

As a Muskoka realtor I try to ensure that my buyers are aware of the water source at any potential home or cottage they want to purchase. I include a potability (safe drinking water) clause and often include a clause about the well pump and production. However, no home owner can control the water table and if you are living with a well, or plan to be, you will need to understand how it works and how to best protect your family in the occasional drought we experience here in Muskoka.

Getting ready to sell your Muskoka Home This Spring

Curb Appeal - Karen ActonMy years as a Muskoka Realtor have taught me many things and one of the most important things I have learned is that buyers have choices even in a “Hot Market” and they make decisions about a property almost as soon as they see it. Here are some tips for getting your property sold and making sure that you are not being eliminated in the first 5 minutes of exposure to a buyer.

You only get ONE first Impression

Remember that buyers have choices and you want them to choose your home not the one down the road. They make decisions about a property within a blink of an eye. So you want your home or cottage to look spectacular from the moment they first see it whether that is on-line or in person.

Staging is about condition more than décor

Your home needs to look and feel good but remember buyers are savvy and most often are represented by a Realtor – they will deduct from the offer price their own “perceived value” for things that need repair or maintenance. Repair anything that needs it, replace any fixtures that look dated and clean like your life depends on it. Elbow grease is cheap and adds tons of value. Remember, buyers are buying their new house not your old one.

 Update the kitchen

This is usually the most important room in the house to a buyer. If they fall in love in the kitchen they will often compromise in other areas on their “must have” list.  Remember fresh clean and bright are always in style. Even if the budget will not allow for big changes clean and clear countertops, add new door knobs on the cabinets and drawers and if possible consider new flooring and countertops.

 Bathrooms are the second most important room in the house

If you have the budget for it, upgrade what you can, at least in the main bath. The same principle of fresh clean and bright applies here too. Consider changing the old cabinet-style sink for a pedestal or furniture sink and remember storage is vital. Make sure linen storage is organized and accessible.

Make bedrooms neutral

Do not assume that a buyer will be able to envision their belongings in your rooms.  Very often they can’t especially when they are faced with strong colours and lots of clutter. You have a five-minute opportunity to get this house sold so if doing some simple fixes in paint colour and or décor will help, it is wise to make the effort.

 It’s NOT Personal

Your plan is to move so pack up the personal stuff before you list. Go through each room and take a moment to remember and then pack the sentimentality away.  What stirs your heart can cloud the judgement of a potential buyer. Remove and store as many personal items as possible including family photos, certificates awards and diplomas.

 Pack it NOW

Get a head start on your move. Start deciding what you want to keep/donate/discard. Pack it up and get it out into a storage space. Your closets and cupboards will look bigger and more organized. Storage space is one of the most frequently requested interior features.

The nose knows!

More and more people are suffering from allergies. Worldwide, sensitization rates to one or more common allergens are approaching 50 per cent.  So it is quite possible that a future buyer will be a sufferer.  Remember when you live in your house you will not be able to smell what others do.  The best option is no smells at all rather than the cloying smell of a chemical air freshener.  Open windows when the season allows, if you have pets, remove them from the property for the duration of the sales process if possible and definitely for showings. Hopefully you have family who will help out with this. A good vacuum cleaner will help remove pollens and dander and you will need to do it often and always prior to a showing.

 Let there be light

Make sure every light bulb is energy efficient and at the highest wattage the fixture will take. Clean all the fixtures for maximum sparkle. Turn on lights before you leave for the showing so every room is bright for the buyers to see.

 Curb appeal

Before a potential buyer will even think about viewing your property they will often drive by it and half of them will do it at night. That means you need to put considerable thought into creating great curb appeal. Never underestimate its power. Curb appeal done well is like gift wrapping on a present. The National Association of Realtors says, “Great curb appeal sells more than half of all houses that go on the market.” Outdoor lighting is important. Light up the porch or entrance way making sure that the address numbers of the house are illuminated and visible. Consider lighting pathways and perhaps a spot light feature of the property like a beautiful tree or the front façade.   Curb appeal includes the outdoor living features on the property too.  This is one of the most undervalued aspects of market preparedness that will add dollars to your bottom line. Ninety five per cent of people surveyed said outdoor living amenities are vital. Outdoor allure also includes balconies, decks and patios.

As a Muskoka Realtor I see many beautiful locations and I know that savvy home and cottage owners  take advantage of these fantastic settings as well. Remember – Give your potential buyer what they don’t know they want, but when they see it they can’t resist. It’s  a great way to help generate offers faster.