Keeping Your Muskoka Home Mould Free

mould-in-bathroomCan you safely and permanently clean up mould and mildew in your Muskoka Home? We have all heard about how some moulds are toxic so how do you know what you can tackle and what you should leave to a professional?

As a Realtor, I see all types of homes and cottages, from elaborate and grand to small and cozy and I can assure you, that any one of them can be prone to mould. It is not a question of cleanliness but more one of ventilation.  When you find mould in your home it is better to take care of it sooner rather than later. Mould can cause health problems and damage what it grows on. The spores of mould fungi commonly float through the air and when they adhere to damp surfaces and start to grow, they can gradually consume the surface. The key to keeping your Muskoka home in great shape is to get the cleanup done before any damage happens.

There are lots of different types of mould which are more accurately called fungi. Many produce allergens that can cause health related reactions in some people

  • Eye, nose and throat irritation
  • Coughing and phlegm build-up
  • Wheezing and shortness of breath
  • Symptoms of asthma
  • Allergic reactions

Health Canada has a great web page with helpful video segments and lots of tips and recommendations.

Moulds cannot grow without moisture so controlling moisture is the key to preventing and or eliminating mould growth. Moulds are very fast growing organisms and can take hold in a very short time. Add a little heat to the mix and in just a few hours mould can have a real grip on your home. In warm Southern climates, if you leave your laundry in the washing machine for just a few hours after the cycle has finished, you could have mould all over the laundry.

Where is Mould Most Common

A leaky roof or plumbing, flood damage, or indoor humidity that’s too high and without proper ventilation can all lead to mould problems. Anyplace that remains damp and unventilated is a potential mould-forming zone. “Anywhere water travels” in a structure is vulnerable to mould. That includes areas where major plumbing arteries are located, crawl spaces with drains, walls plumbed from bathroom to bathroom and between floors. Incorrectly sealed tubs and faulty construction can cause water to seep into crevices and create big problems over time.  Buildings that are tightly sealed may lack adequate ventilation, which can lead to moisture buildup.

Most Mould-Prone Areas

  • Basements or cellars
  • Under kitchen and bathroom sinks
  • Under or behind refrigerators
  • Behind walls that house plumbing
  • Around air-conditioning units
  • Baseboards or around windowsills
  • Under carpeting

Mildew is another fungi-produced coating that can form on damp surfaces. Mildew usually grows in a flat pattern and appears powdery and white or gray. Moulds are darker in color, usually black or green but can be almost any colour. Moulds penetrate the surface of what it’s growing on. You may follow the same cleaning steps below to remove mould and mildew.

Mould Removal

Here are some options I’ve seen on a variety of websites for simple surface mould removal.

Bleach: Mix 1 cup bleach with enough water to make 1 gallon. Put the solution in a spray bottle, or spread it with a sponge or cloth. There’s no need to rinse.

Borax: Mix 1 cup borax with enough water to make 1 gallon. Borax is less harsh-smelling and corrosive than bleach. Apply the solution to the surface and scrub with a brush; don’t rinse. Wipe the surface dry.

Vinegar: Use full-strength vinegar in a spray bottle. Spray the affected area and wipe off.

Ammonia: This is suitable for killing mould on smooth, nonporous surfaces. NEVER USE IT WITH BLEACH. Treat the area with a solution of equal parts ammonia and water, leave on for 10 minutes, and rinse with water.

Hydrogen peroxide: Spray full-strength (3%)hydrogen peroxide on the mouldy surface and let it sit for 10 minutes to loosen the mould. Wipe the surface and don’t rinse.

Baking soda: Mix ½ teaspoon baking soda in 1 gallon water and scrub the mouldy surface, then rinse with water. This is particularly useful for killing mould on upholstery.

Tea tree oil: Use 1 teaspoon tea tree oil per cup of water and spray on the surface. Leave it on for a few minutes and then wipe off.

Note: Health Canada suggests that before beginning any mould clean-up, take steps to ensure that you do not expose yourself or others to mould spores. It is recommended that you wear an adequate breathing mask (N95 or better respirator), safety glasses or goggles and rubber gloves.

Even with adequate precautions, mould spores may become airborne. As a precaution during clean-up, children, the elderly and sensitive people such as those with asthma, allergies or other health problems should leave the house. Consult your physician if in doubt.

To Clean or Throw Away?

If the mould is on a porous surface, such as carpeting, ceiling tiles, drywall or wallpaper, the items might have to be thrown away since the mould may be impossible to remove.

When Should You Call a Professional?

Wiping down mildew in damp areas is always a good idea, but how do you know when it’s time to bring in a professional? Health Canada advises using a mould remediation expert if there is

  • One or more patches of mould larger than 1 square metre
  • More than three patches of mould less than 1 square metre
  • Patches of mould that keep coming back after cleaning
  • A mould problem that you cannot solve on your own

 

Testing for Mould

Chronic allergy-type health problems or mildew odors mean it’s time to consider more extensive mould treatment. Start by using a mould testing company, which will take samples, send them to a lab, and obtain a report on mould levels and species. Use a company that does testing only, to avoid a conflict of interest. Once the mould species are identified you can determine if a remediation specialist is indicated.

Mould Remediation

There is no doubt that some types of mould are toxigenic meaning they produce substances toxic to humans. They are rare in this region but it you have a lot of mould or several different looking moulds you really should call a professional to take care of the situation. Below are several companies that service this area and should be able to assist you.

Mold Removal | Mold Remediation | Muskoka, Huntsville, Bracebridge

www.svmmuskoka.ca/services.php?s=mold

Mould Removal & Remediation | Restoration 1 Muskoka

muskoka.restoration1.ca/moldremoval/

Mould Removal & Remediation ON | R&F Construction | R&F …

www.rfconstruction.com/mould-asbestos/mould/

 

How to Prevent Mould

Just like granny always said “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” so the very best way to deal with mould and mildew is to prevent it from growing in the first place.  Controlling moisture inside your Muskoka home is the key to avoiding mould. Consider an annual inspection of roofing, plumbing, exterior drainage and interior ventilation to verify that there are no repairs required. Check for leaks under sinks and in crawl spaces. Always use ventilation in a bathroom to remove condensation from showers.

New Mortgage Rules and your Muskoka Home

Modern Family E.jpgYou may or may not know that the federal government recently announced some big changes concerning the guidelines for borrowers of high-ratio mortgages – a borrower who has a deposit of less than 20 per cent of the purchase price of a home. These guidelines must be adhered to by banks but not private mortgage lenders.

If you plan to borrow from a bank and need mortgage default insurance you must now meet the mortgage “stress test.” This means that as a borrower, you must be able to carry a mortgage based on current Bank of Canada rate for a five-year term which is currently 4.64%. This could be much higher than the rate for the term that your bank may be willing to offer you. Current 5 year posted fixed rates at many major banks are under 3%. While your payment will be based on the actual rate charged by your bank for the mortgage you agree upon, you must qualify based on the higher rate.  This means if you are “tight” on your debt service ratio calculation you may be qualify for less than you did prior to this change. Taking the time to get pre-approved is even more important now than before.

If you already have a home these new requirements and guidelines do not affect you, or if your pre-approved mortgage commitment was already in existence prior to Oct. 17, 2016, however there may have a deadline for you to use that commitment. These changes are only for high ratio mortgages and will not affect you if you have more than 20% down payment.

If you are considering an investment property in Muskoka you will be glad to know these new provisions do not affect you. However, that is because most lenders have restricted the amount they will lend on investment properties to 80 per cent of the appraised value or purchase price, whichever is the lower amount.

These changes will likely affect the ability of some first-time home buyers to qualify for a mortgage.  If you are a first-time buyer it may mean a longer wait before your purchase while you accumulate a bigger deposit or it may mean making the decision that your first home will be a little less glamorous than you may have hoped for.

This may all sound a bit gloomy but let’s be positive about it. By using this stress test, you should be less stressed about your ability to make your payments each month and when your mortgage comes up for maturity, IF the interest rates are higher, you should be able to afford the increased payment.

Ultimately this is a consumer protection bid by our government designed to help people keep their homes and not lose them if interest rates increase significantly.

November was Financial Literacy Month, and CREA (Canadian Real Estate Association)  the national association to which I belong, has developed some resources you can use all year long to help understand some of the trickier financial concepts you might encounter during the home buying process.

There is a series of eight videos which cover topics from amortization to mortgage pre-payment to the Home Buyers’ Plan (HBP) and beyond. Each video is under two minutes and done in a fun, animated style, the videos break down some of the financial terms and implications you might come across.

The videos can be found here 

You may also enjoy looking at the Homebuyers’ Road Map, a publication developed in collaboration with the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada, to help Canadians navigate the home buying journey.

Ultimately knowledge is power so I hope you will use these resources and will not hesitate to call me if you have any questions about buying your first or next home in Muskoka or if you have questions about your present home and the implications of these new mortgage rules.

 

 

Understanding the Financing Clause when Buying Muskoka Home

What is a Mortgage - Karen Acton Royal LePage Lakes of MuskokaOur market in Muskoka has been very active this last few years and sometimes the temptation to make offers unconditional can be very strong.

As a buyer, you may have been pre-approved and feel that it is safe to buy unconditionally only to be caught up by a lender’s requirement that you cannot meet.  At the last minute, you may even have to come up with a larger down payment.  If you are unable to do so, this could leave you not only losing your dream home but potentially subject to the consequences of a breach of contract.

As a seller, an unconditional offer is always very appealing but if that buyer cannot produce funds on closing the results cannot only be heart breaking, but you may be faced with losing the home you hoped to buy and possibly being in breach of your contract with the seller of your future home.

As a Realtor® I always strive to guide my clients with good advice and protect them from making a mistake. I know that when a buyer finds the perfect home or cottage they want it and don’t want to be outbid.  My job is to be the voice of reason. Unless you have the resources to buy with cash or a very large down payment that well exceeds most lenders’ requirements, a financing clause is simply the best option.

In a recent article Mark Weisleder a Partner, author and speaker at the law firm Real Estate Lawyers.ca LLP covered the following important points.

1. Pre-approvals are no guarantee you will obtain your financing

Too many buyers are cavalier about submitting offers without a financing condition, especially during the pressure of a bidding war. You must understand that even with a pre-approval, the lender must be satisfied with its own appraisal. The foundation for most appraisals is what would a willing buyer pay a willing seller, WITHOUT pressure? In a bidding war, there is almost always pressure on the buyer. This is why the appraisal will likely be lower than what the buyer offered and the lender will offer you less money than you hoped for. The answer is always to have an extra 5-10% of the down payment in reserve to protect you. In a condominium purchase, if it is conditional upon review of a status certificate, use that time to also make sure your financing is in order.

 2. Lenders can change their mind right up until the day of closing

Even if you are approved after you sign your agreement, the lender can still change their minds based on anything which they may learn before they advance funds. There are usually many conditions attached to any loan approval, such as verification of income, down payment, employment. Make sure you work with your mortgage broker to satisfy all of these conditions and requirements as soon as possible in the process. The worst words a lawyer can hear from a lender on the day of closing is “The file is in underwriting”. This typically means that someone else is reviewing the entire file because issues have arisen. In some cases this can result in the entire loan being cancelled, right on the day of closing. In our firm, since we receive and send funds via wire transfer, we are fortunately able to complete deals even when lenders are late transferring funds to our trust account.

 3. Always know the net amount you will receive from your lender

Every mortgage commitment is different. Some may contain up-front fees for arranging the loan, appraisals, CMHC fees and HST, interest to the interest adjustment date. All of these fees are deducted right off the top, before the balance is sent to your lawyer on the day of closing. The bottom line is you must know the exact amount that will be sent to your lawyer on closing, to make sure you have enough to make up the rest of the down payment, land transfer tax and legal fees. At our firm we remind clients to send us their mortgage instructions early in the process so that we can get them the net amount they will need to complete the transaction in a timely manner.

In Muskoka lenders sometimes have requirements for additional documentation. Things like water potability certificates, septic use permits, proof of properly installed water treatment (disinfection) systems, road access agreements to prove year round access, final occupancy permits and zoning even an inspector’s statement regarding the type of wiring and insulation. A mortgage can’t be advanced without insurance on the property, so a W.E.T.T. inspection may be necessary for wood burning devices. Ultimately the underwriter at the lending institution is responsible for making sure that the lender’s investment is protected.  Sadly, they are not concerned with how much a buyer loves a property or how much the seller needs the transaction to close.

I hope that after reading this you will be cautious when buying or selling a Muskoka home or cottage. A good Realtor® will always put the interests of the client ahead of their own and encourage you to use a financing clause if there is any possibility you may need one.

Fall and Winter Safety Tips for Your Muskoka Home

Fall Maintenance in your Bacebridge Home - Karen ActonIt’s finally here, in spite of the glorious weather the leaves are turning and Fall has arrived. October usually brings us our first burst of cold and a time change that means it’s time to check our smoke and C02 alarms again. It is also a great time to check your furnace filters and clean out the dust that may have accumulated in your duct work.

Here are some other tips put together from the web site of the Ontario Fire Marshal to help keep you and your Muskoka home safe.

FIREPLACES

• Clean the ashes regularly. When you remove fireplace embers or ash, place them in a metal container with a lid and cover them with water. Do not place them in a plastic or paper bag or other container that is not fire-resistant. Do not dispose of them indoors or close to your home or another structure.
• Use care with “fire salts,” which produce coloured flames when thrown on wood fires. They contain heavy metals that can cause intense gastrointestinal irritation and vomiting if eaten. Keep them away from children.
• Never burn gift wrappings, boxes, cartons, or other types of packing in the fireplace. They burn too rapidly and generate far too much heat.
• Always use a screen in front of the fireplace to protect against flying sparks.
• Never use gasoline or any other flammable liquids to start a fire.
• Use only seasoned and dried wood.
• Never leave the fire unattended or let it smolder.

CANDLES

• Extinguish candles when leaving the room or going to sleep. Keep lit candles away from items that can catch fire
• Place candles in sturdy, burn-resistant containers that won’t tip over and are big enough to collect dripping wax.
• Don’t place lit candles near windows, where blinds or curtains may close or blow over them.
• Don’t use candles in high traffic areas where children or pets could knock them over.
• Never leave children or pets alone in a room with lit candles.
• Do not allow older children to light candles in their bedrooms. A forgotten candle or an accident is all it takes to start a fire.
• During power outages, exercise caution when using candles as a light source. Many destructive fires start when potential fire hazards go unnoticed in the dark.
• Never use a candle for light when fueling equipment such as a camp fuel heater or lantern.
• Keep candle wicks short at all times. Trim the wick to one-quarter inch (6.4 mm).
• Be wary of buying novelty candles. Avoid candles surrounded by flammable paint, paper, dried flowers, or containers that can melt or break.
• Never let candles burn out completely. Extinguish taper and pillar candles when they burn to within two inches of the holder, and container candles before the last half-inch of wax begins to melt.
• Use extreme caution when carrying a lit candle, holding it well away from your clothes and any combustibles that may be along your path.

HEATING SYSTEMS

• Keep anything that can burn at least three-feet away from heating equipment, like the furnace, fireplace, wood stove, or portable space heater.
• Have a three-foot “kid-free zone” around open fires and space heaters.
• Never use your oven to heat your home.
• Have a qualified professional install stationary space heating equipment, water heaters or central heating equipment according to the local codes and manufacturer’s instructions.
• Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional.
• Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.
• Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters.
• Be sure all furnace controls and emergency shutoffs are in proper working condition.
• Leave furnace repairs to qualified specialists. Do not attempt repairs yourself unless you are qualified.
• Inspect the walls and ceiling near the furnace and along the chimney line. If the wall is hot or discoloured, additional pipe insulation or clearance may be required.
• Check the flue pipe and pipe seams. Are they well supported, free of holes, and cracks? Soot along or around seams may be an indicator of a leak.
• Is the chimney solid, with no cracks or loose bricks? All unused flue openings should be sealed with solid masonry.

KITCHEN SAFETY

• If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol don’t use the stove or stovetop.
• Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.
• If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you are cooking.
• Keep anything that can catch fire — oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains — away from your stovetop.
• Again, have a “kid-free zone” of at least 3 feet around the stove and areas where hot food or drink is prepared or carried.

Grease and fat fires are a leading cause of home fires in Canada, so be extra careful when doing this kind of cooking. Here’s what to do if grease in a pot or pan catches fire:

• Smother the flames by covering the pan with a lid. Do not remove the lid until the pan is completely cooled.
• Turn off the heat immediately.
• Use baking soda (flour can be explosive) on shallow grease fires.
• Never turn on the overhead fan, as this could spread the fire.
• Never throw water on a grease fire.

It may seem that I am stating the obvious but it is amazing how easily we can become complacent and after such a long and lovely summer at your Muskoka Home or Cottage it is a good thing to take a moment to think about the things we all need to do as we shift from summer mode to winter mode. Remember, as we “fall back” change your clock and take time to make your Muskoka home or cottage safe for Fall and Winter.

Avoiding Buyer’s Remorse When You Buy a Muskoka Home

the-thinkerDid you ever buy something special and later realize you didn’t really need it or like it after all? It could have been something as small as a new shirt or pair of shoes or as big as an appliance, but no matter what it was, returning it was likely, as easy as packing it back up, locating the receipt, and taking it back to the store for a full refund or exchange.

Most things you buy you get to try first, however, unlike store merchandise or a car you can test drive, you can’t “try before you buy” your new Muskoka home.

This makes your decision to buy or not buy extremely important and potentially stressful. Not only is a home a huge investment, it’s also where your family will be spending the next several years of your lives.
Your home is not just a shelter; it is where your memories are made.

Here are some suggestions so you can avoid feeling remorseful after your offer has been accepted, or worse, living in a house you don’t love.

Make a checklist.                                                                                                                                    Make a list of the things that are really important to you in a home. Ensure you include the ‘can’t have’ as well as the ‘want to have’. Some things will be ‘must have’ – deal breakers; others may be more negotiable. Separate the needs from the wants. It can be helpful to choose the top three.

When viewing homes, it’s hard to remember details after you have seen several houses, so take the list with you and check off items that each property has and make notes regarding missing ones. Can you be happy without them? Can they be improved or added later? It’s important to share this information with your REALTOR® and provide lots of feedback at each showing to help narrow down your search.
Have you seen the home more than once?
No matter how much you think you love a property, if you’ve only seen it once, you could be heading for buyer’s remorse. If possible, go back at a different time of day to get another perspective. You may see things differently the second time around. You may have missed something during your first visit that will stand out the second time. Or, you may like the home even better.

Explore every aspect the property.
Your first viewing of the property will have provided a basic understanding of the floor plan, condition and size. But, to really know if it is the right one for you, take time to experience the property. Your REALTOR® will want you to be sure it right for you too. Drive around the neighbourhood. Walk the boundaries of the lot, and look at the back of the home. Open every closet and go in the all the rooms, the basement, and garage. An offer can include a Home Inspection condition. This will provide an additional opportunity for you, along with your Home Inspector, to carefully review all aspects of the home.

Is this home what you set out to buy in the first place?
Frequently buyers modify their wants and needs throughout the search process. Did you lose focus on what you were looking for? Is this home going to meet your needs now and for the foreseeable future? Have you made a compromise that you will regret? Choosing a different neighbourhood to get a better price could end up being a mistake. Be sure you do not lose sight of the “needs” part of you search criteria by getting caught up in the “wants”.

Do you “want” this house or do you want to “win” this house?
Often, in a competitive situation, a buyer just wants to “win.” If you’re competing in a multiple offer situation, step back and ask yourself: Is this the home I really want or do I just want to beat out the other buyers? Also, has the potential purchase price exceeded your comfort zone? Putting an offer on a home at a price reflective of its market value is one thing. But after a few rounds of counter offers you may be looking at an amount that exceeds the list price. This may still be the home’s value but if it is more than you can comfortably afford it may be time to step away rather than “win”.
So, if you think you’ve found the perfect Muskoka home, ask yourself these questions. Ultimately, I want a client to sign an agreement only when they are completely convinced they have found the right home for them. If the home is not a “good fit” it cannot be put it back in the box and returned for a refund!

As your REALTOR® it is my mission to help you find a Muskoka home that will not only meet your needs but will bring you a sense of joy and contentment for years to come.

Building a Muskoka Cottage

renovatingSometimes when a client is looking for a perfect Muskoka Cottage they can be disappointed since many of the best and most appealing lot/cottage combinations can be quite expensive. In some cases clients then start to think about finding a lot and creating the perfect cottage from scratch.

Here are some important considerations to ponder before you decide to change track and start looking for a vacant waterfront lot:

  • Is the lot “ready to go?” In Muskoka realtors usually use the language “partially serviced” or “fully serviced” in the listing details to indicate if all or some of the required services —electricity, water, sewage, cell, internet—is directly available to the site.
  • If a road access is not developed and utilities are not already available to the site the lot value will be significantly lower than a serviced lot, but before you snap up a bargain you NEED to first find out whether it is even possible to connect to these services and determine how much it will cost to hook up. When additional utility poles are required to bridge the distance from an existing service to the building envelope, the costs can be prohibitive.
  • If utilities are not available or are excessively expensive, you may want to look into what, if any services you can generate yourself. Electricity is most likely the largest obstacle and if road access is seasonal, private or non-existent, you may need to consider solar or wind as a source as well as traditional electrical generators. Most cottages have septic systems and draw water from the lake/river or a well. Consider these expenses as well.
  • Do not forget your design costs. To get a building permit you must have certified plans so even if you do not have custom drawings you will need to make sure any plan you buy is stamped. If you are planning to use older plans that have been given to you, you will have to pay to get them stamped and maybe modified to meet current code requirements.
  • Throughout the Muskoka region there can be lot levies to pay at the time of obtaining your building permit. Depending on the municipality and the level of services at the site they can range from $6000 -$15000 and must be paid in full before a permit can be issued.
  • If you are not building your own cottage and intend to use a local contractor you would be well advised to have several contractors bid on your project. Get references and have a contract drawn up. Make sure your builder has WSIB coverage for himself and any of his sub trades. You will be expected to pay a significant portion of the cost up front to offset the cost of material and labour. You may want to consider acting as your own General contractor and work on a time and materials basis with your builder by setting up accounts with the suppliers and paying for the material directly. You should also budget many hours of your time to oversee the project. Whatever you decide, get more than a hand shake! There are many excellent builders in this area but there also some who will take on a project beyond their capabilities and cause you no end of additional expense.
  • It is possible to manage costs by building in stages. Put up a basic cottage initially but have it designed to put an add-on wing in a few years.. If this appeals to you, the only thing you need to do at the start is make sure your final plan can be accommodated under the applicable zoning regulations.

In conclusion building your perfect Muskoka Cottage may be what you end up deciding to do, however it is unlikely you will actually save a large amount of money. The process can be challenging and at times very frustrating.

Ultimately, clients who build, do seem to have a great sense of pride in their cottage. There is no doubt building to your exact needs will make your Muskoka Cottage the place you love to spend endless hours with family and friends!

Remember I am always happy to help and can put my years of experience and contacts to good use on your behalf.

Buying Your First Muskoka Cottage

zeleznik 003So you think you are ready to buy your first cottage! As a Muskoka Realtor I am here to help you navigate through the process smoothly, so you can begin to enjoy cottage life.

The starting point for this adventure is to sit with your family and determine what it is you are really looking for. The considerations are many, from the size of the building and the lake, to the type of access you will want.

You have probably spent time in a cottage, either rented, or with friends or family. Think about the very best of those experiences. You may be surprised to find that the favorite memories of your cottage experiences centre on things you had not thought you wanted or needed.

Some of the most important considerations are:

  • Distance from your home – A long drive after work on Friday afternoon may not seem like a big deal now but it needs to be factored into the decision making process. It will affect the amount of time you spend at your cottage. Will you continue to love and enjoy your property if the drive to Muskoka becomes a trial with jobs and children?
  •  Size of cottage – is the size of your family established or will there be children in your future? Do you want to be able to rent it and if so, what is the best number of bedrooms for a rental?
  • Size of the lake or river – often buyers want to be on a large lake and are willing to pay a premium for it. However, in reality they do not have a large boat and never utilize all of the lake. A smaller lake or substantial river is often quieter and for most families will be more than sufficient. And they usually come with smaller price tags!
  • Accessibility – Do you plan to use the cottage in the winter? Are you prepared to pay private road fees, if any? Would water access work for you?
  • Stunning view or level to the water? – Remember that Muskoka is famous for its rugged beauty so there are far more lots with some elevation than there are level ones.
  • Privacy – Everyone wants privacy so it is a feature that will increase the cost. How private do you need it to be? Great memories at the cottage often include activities with other cottagers!
  • Services – To some, the cottage experience is a rustic, 1 bathroom, lake water no dishwasher cabin. To others, the cottage is a place of relaxed luxury, with en suite bathrooms, 5 appliances, a drilled well and high speed internet? Muskoka has it all; you just need to know what you want.

In general, you can expect properties on larger lakes to be more expensive than those on smaller ones. Properties that have level to moderately sloped lots tend to have a higher asking price than those on steeper lots. A western or southern exposure will have a higher price tag also!

It is worth remembering that the building itself, is of secondary importance. Buildings can be repaired, renovated, and rebuilt over time. In many cases, the building represents only a small part of the property's value. So choosing the right lot and waterfront is of primary importance.

Finding the perfect cottage is a highly personal adventure, everyone has their own dream. I can help you to determine your wants and needs, and select appropriate properties for you to view. Rest assured you will know the right cottage when you see it. I would love to help you make your cottage dream come true! Call now to get started.