It’s time to get your Muskoka Home ready for the cold weather!

Fruit Flies - Karen Acton Muskoka RealtorIt’s finally here the first nip in the air that signals a change of season. From the first days of September, which probably still feel like summer, to the last, when you will be able to notice a chill in the air and even a frost or two. September is a time of transition. Get your home ready for the season ahead by choosing some of the tips from my “to do” list, from adding cozy layers to scheduling necessary maintenance.

Make things cozy. With the first few chilly nights under our belts think about swapping out lighter-weight bedding for flannel sheets and fluffy duvets. This will allow you to keep the furnace turned off for a week or two more!  Bring added warmth to your living room with throws and pillows in rich fabrics and deep colours. Remember that area rugs and curtains not only make a room feel cozier, but they also can help your home feel warmer and can help reduce your energy bills.

Order in your winter fuel. Get a jump start on the local demand by calling the fuel oil or propane supplier your use and getting your tanks topped up. If you use a wood stove for actual warmth or just for coziness, now is a good time to order a delivery of firewood. Remember, don’t store large quantities of wood directly against your home or cottage as it can encourage pests, but do keep it protected from rain and snow.

Vacuum radiators, baseboard heaters and heating grates. Prepare for the heating season by vacuuming up dust from radiators, baseboard heaters and heating grates. If you have radiators with covers, remove the covers and vacuum beneath them before replacing.

Check safety devices.  Take a few minutes to do one of the most important tasks you can for your family…test the smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors and replace batteries as needed. Don’t forget to check the expiration date on your fire extinguisher and replace if needed.

Clean and store your AC units. If you use window air-conditioning units, now is the time to either remove them or cover them outside with protective insulation. Removing the units is better as it allows, you to close the windows and this will minimize winter heat loss. Use a shop vac to clean the dust and debris out of the vents before covering them for storage.

Cover or store outdoor furniture and BBQ. If you plan to leave your patio furniture or BBQ outside through the fall and winter, cover them well and stow them beneath an overhang that will protect them from rain and snow.

Add weather-stripping. Newer windows may not need weather-stripping, but it will help most older windows retain heat and stop drafts. Doors, including the patio doors you will not use too often during winter, also need to be sealed if they are older.  Check areas with previously applied weather-stripping and remove or replace as needed.

Inspect the roof and gutters. This one may need to be done at the end of the month or even next month if the leaves are late changing this year!  Clean out the gutters and downspouts, pull out any sticks or other debris blocking the gutters, and make note of any worn-out seals around vent pipes and chimneys. If you do not feel comfortable on a ladder, or have a home of two or more stories, hire someone to do a quick inspection for you. Schedule any needed repairs now so that your home will be ready for winter.

Schedule chimney and furnace maintenance. Make sure your fireplace and heating system are clean, safe and ready to go by having a professional look at them now. Having your chimney cleaned will also ensure that you don’t try to start a fire when an animal nest or creosote build up is inside. If you don’t have a chimney cap yet, speak with your chimney sweep about adding a one. The metal cap with screened sides can prevent critters from getting in and helps protect your roof from burning embers.

Maintain the washer and dryer. Cleaning out the dryer vents can be a DIY job, but if you don’t feel comfortable doing so (or if you’ve been putting it off), you may want to hire a pro to do washer and dryer maintenance for you. Washing-machine hoses need to be replaced from time to time, and a cracked hose can cause a leak — which can mean costly damage to your home. Clean dryer vents and hoses will help your machine work more efficiently and reduce the risk of fire.

With these important things looked after, you can look forward to the change of seasons knowing that you’ll be safe and warm in your Muskoka home.

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Choosing a Great Muskoka Realtor

Closing you Braceridge Home Purchase - Karen Acton Royal LePageAs a Muskoka Realtor I cannot sell your home for you or help you purchase one until I have sold you on me! Here are some great reasons why you should consider using my services to ensure that your have a satisfying Realtor experience.

Education and Experience

You do not need to know everything about buying and selling real estate if you hire me. I have taken the required RECO courses and have many years of practical award-winning experience that you can benefit from. After all Henry Ford said, “When you hire people who are smarter than you are, you prove you are smarter than they are.”

Neighbourhood Knowledge

I know my area well. I not only list and sell in the Muskoka area I live here and have for many years.  I know about the Muskoka communities and if I do not have a specific answer for you, I know who to ask.

Concierge Service

I have a great network of other Realtors, Lawyers, Home Inspectors and Mortgage Lenders who I can call upon to help me assist you.

Handle All the Required Paperwork

In the 1970’s you could buy or sell a property using a one-page document but today with all the Federal, Provincial and Regulatory paperwork required you will need to deal with several sets of multi-page documents to achieve a successful sale or purchase. I can and will guide you through it all and make sure you understand what you are signing before you sign it!

Understand Market Conditions

Real estate markets are often in a state of flux.  While there can be periods of stability, that can change quiet suddenly. A loss of jobs in a community can make a large difference and turn a sellers’ market into a buyers’ one in just a few days. It is my job to be alert to these changes and advise you accordingly.

Value and Price Guidance

Contrary to popular belief, it is not my job to tell you what price to list your property for or what to offer on the one you want to buy.  However, it is my job to provide you with some actual market data to draw conclusions about CURRENT market values and give you my insights based on my experience. That way you can make an informed decision.

Be Your Buffer

As your representative it is my job to filter out all the spam! When I list your property, I will not be the only one showing it, so I will prepare your listing with all the details, documents, and information a potential buyer needs so they can make a decision easily and without waiting for answers. When you are buying I will methodically determine exactly what type of property you like and then only take you to properties with a high probability of meeting your criteria.

Negotiation Skills

Whether you are buying or selling it is almost impossible to keep your emotions out of the mix. I am your “cool calm and collected” negotiator.  I will stand between you and your equally emotional counterpart and negotiate for you the best price and terms possible.

Your Person

Once you have an accepted offer I am not going to disappear from the picture. I will continue to be standing beside you answering your questions. When you have general questions and don’t want to bother your lawyer or mortgage broker, call me. When you want to know where to buy a fridge or hire a great plumber or contractor call me. I will be happy to help.

Realtor for Life

This one may sound a bit cliché but I really do want to earn that title. Many of my past clients call me for a re-evaluation of a home or cottage that I assisted them with years ago. They do not intend to sell but simply want to manage their assets and need to know.  I am happy to offer this service to them. I am often asked to assist family or friends of my past clients in Muskoka with buying or selling; or to find a Realtor for them in another community that will give them the same level of service they enjoyed with me. I work hard to earn this level of loyalty from my clients as I do sincerely love my profession and want to be your Muskoka Realtor for life!

 

Managing your well in a Muskoka Drought

dug_wellIn all areas, including Muskoka, groundwater levels in wells will vary over time.  While we are not experiencing an official drought yet, we are definitely in a “dry spell” and more and more people are starting to have issues with water levels and the quality of water in their wells. Water conservation and pump adjustments can help manage your water well during drought.

Droughts can be stressful for the many Muskoka residents who rely on private wells for their water supply. As wells tap groundwater aquifers that cannot easily be seen or monitored the very invisible nature of groundwater leads to an uneasy feeling among home and cottage owners relying on wells. There is an almost constant fear that their water supply could dry up without warning. 

The Normal Cycle of Groundwater Levels

The water level in a groundwater well will fluctuate naturally during the year. Groundwater levels tend to be highest during March and April in response to winter snowmelt and spring rainfall. The movement of rain and snowmelt into groundwater is known as recharge.

Groundwater levels usually begin to fall in May and continue to decline during the summer. Groundwater recharge is limited during late spring and summer because trees and other plants use the available water to grow. Natural groundwater levels usually reach their lowest point in late September or October. In late fall, after trees and plants have stopped growing and before snow begins to fall, groundwater levels may rise in response to rainfall and recharge. Groundwater recharge persists through the fall until cold temperatures produce snowfall and frozen soil that limit the ability of water to infiltrate into the ground. Groundwater levels during winter may be stable or fall slightly until spring snowmelt and rainstorms start the annual cycle again. Given this natural cycle of groundwater, most problems with wells tend to occur in late summer or early fall when groundwater levels naturally reach their lowest levels.

How Can I Conserve Water?

Water conservation measures become critical during times of drought. If you rely on a private well, you should conserve water as mush as possible always and especially as soon as drought conditions occur.

You can significantly reduce the water use within your cottage or home by making changes in habits and by installing water-saving devices. Examples might include flushing the toilet less often, taking shorter showers, only washing full loads of dishes or laundry, not rinsing dishes before the dishwasher unless especially dirty, not rinsing anything under running water but filling a sink or basin to rinse, brushing teeth with a glass of water and not a running tap, collecting water from roof gutters into rain barrels for outside use. Other good things to implement are household bans on the nonessential use of water such as car washing and lawn watering.  

What Can I Do If My Well Runs Dry?

There are a number of reasons why a well may quit producing water. Water quality problems like iron bacteria and sediment may clog the well and severely restrict water flow and the recovery rate of the well. This becomes more noticeable in dry seasons when there is less ground water available. Shocking or cleaning your well may increase the flow of water however it will not bring back water to a dry well unless the water table comes back up.

Under persistent dry weather conditions, the water level in your well may drop below the submersible pump or intake foot valve, causing a loss of water. In some cases, the water level may only temporarily drop below the pump/intake when water is being frequently drawn from the well during showers or laundry. Under these conditions, you may be able to continue using the well by initiating emergency water conservation measures and using water only for essential purposes.

If the water level permanently drops below the submersible pump or intake, it may be possible to lower the pump/intake within the existing well. In most cases this will only provide a short-term solution to the problem. More permanent solutions require either deepening the existing well or drilling a new well. Be aware that deepening an existing well may not increase the well yield and could produce water of different water quality characteristics. You should consult with a local well driller  to determine the best solution for your situation.

Proper management of private wells during droughts will become more important as competition for water in Muskoka increases.

Can I have water delivered to my well?

The simple answer is of course yes but the honest one is that it is not worth it. A well is a tube not a cistern. It has no bottom so if you put in several hundred gallons of water it will seep out of the bottom until it is gone or reaches the level of the water table. You will only be able to benefit from the water for a brief time before it drains away. Having water delivered to your well is not a fix and much of what you pay for will seep away.

As a Muskoka realtor I try to ensure that my buyers are aware of the water source at any potential home or cottage they want to purchase. I include a potability (safe drinking water) clause and often include a clause about the well pump and production. However, no home owner can control the water table and if you are living with a well, or plan to be, you will need to understand how it works and how to best protect your family in the occasional drought we experience here in Muskoka.

5 Things to consider when investing in a Muskoka Property with a friend

Friendship HandshakeBuying a cottage or a rental investment property in Muskoka can be a smart financial move. As you pay down the debt, you build equity in a property that will in all likelihood appreciate in value over time.

There are the tax benefits in most cases as you can deduct your rental expenses from any income you earn, including items such as mortgage interest, property taxes, insurance, repair and maintenance costs, and property management, all of which saves you money at tax time. The primary benefit of course is the revenue stream it will generate. However, as owning investment property requires an investment of time and effort as well as money, choosing to share that burden with a friend can make sense. This is definitely appealing but it will come will with some challenges.  Here are five things to give serious consideration to before investing in real estate with a friend.

 1. Your Mortgage Rate Will be Tied to Both Credit Reports

When applying for financing on a property purchase both you and your friend’s credit history will be used.  If one of you has bad credit it can negatively affect the mortgage terms, including the interest rate that you pay on the loan. Remember that even a minor change in interest of even 0.5% will make a big difference in the amount due every month on your mortgage and in the total interest you’ll pay over the life of the loan.

2. You Risk Your Good Credit Rating

When both you and your friend are listed on the mortgage, you are both responsible for making payments. If the mortgage falls behind for whatever reason, the lender will report both of you to the credit agencies for non-payment even if it is not you personally in default. Because both names are on the mortgage, your friend’s non-payment could end up costing you big on your credit report and significantly affect your future potential to borrow money for your personal requirements.

3. You May Have Challenges Getting Other Loans

Assuming there are no issues and you and your friend split the mortgage payment each month 50-50 with no defaults you still need to know that each of you alone is responsible for the entire mortgage payment.  To a new lender, say, for a car loan or a personal home purchase, this can have a substantial impact. They will include the whole payment amount of that mortgage in the debt-to-income ratio calculation and it may make it difficult to qualify for other loans.

4. No “Easy Button” for Moving Out

If you rent an apartment or house with a friend, it’s usually easy to walk away if the two of you no longer get along, or if you just decide to move. Not so with a mortgage. Since both of your names are on the title of the property and the mortgage, you are both responsible for making the payments. To get one of the names off the mortgage and deed, you have to sell the house on the open marker or one to another. Selling on the open market can take time and sometimes even result in a loss if the market conditions are not ideal.

It’s a good idea to have a written agreement in place that details your agreed-upon exit plan should one of you decide to move on. The agreement should also cover what happens if either of you dies. Does the survivor become the sole owner, or does he or she need to buy out the heirs of the deceased partner? What percentage of the property you each own? Will the property be sold, and if so, how will the proceeds be divided?

Another good idea for financial protection is for both parties to purchase life insurance on the mortgage in case of death.

5. Disagreement Over Responsibilities

A great friendship can be quickly tested if there are any disagreements over who is responsible for a property related undertaking.  Payment of utilities and taxes, maintenance, hiring support help when required, budgets for work required and other items that need attending to in a timely fashion are all potential sources of conflict.  To avoid this, include in your written agreement details regarding the breakdown of expenses, how repairs and maintenance will be handled (who will do the work, and how the costs will be shared), plus how deductions will be claimed (e.g., who gets to claim the mortgage interest deduction or whether you split it in some way).

The Bottom Line

Buying an investment property with a friend will have lots of benefits:

  • It should be easier to qualify for a mortgage
  • you get to share all the monthly expenses, including utilities, maintenance/repair costs and the mortgage payment.
  • you get to build equity as you pay down the loan.

This kind of purchase will also have some challenges and it is important to make a well thought-out and informed decision.  Do your homework ahead of time, and make sure you and your friend both have the income to meet the monthly expenses of the investment without relying on any potential income from it.

Most importantly, protect your friendship and avoid trouble down the road by having a written agreement.  It is a good idea to hire a lawyer to write a comprehensive agreement that details who is responsible for what, what happens if one of you wants to move on, and how the property will be handled if one of you passes away.

If you and a friend have been pondering this type of partnership I would be delighted to help you find the perfect property, call or email me today!

Getting ready to sell your Muskoka Home This Spring

Curb Appeal - Karen ActonMy years as a Muskoka Realtor have taught me many things and one of the most important things I have learned is that buyers have choices even in a “Hot Market” and they make decisions about a property almost as soon as they see it. Here are some tips for getting your property sold and making sure that you are not being eliminated in the first 5 minutes of exposure to a buyer.

You only get ONE first Impression

Remember that buyers have choices and you want them to choose your home not the one down the road. They make decisions about a property within a blink of an eye. So you want your home or cottage to look spectacular from the moment they first see it whether that is on-line or in person.

Staging is about condition more than décor

Your home needs to look and feel good but remember buyers are savvy and most often are represented by a Realtor – they will deduct from the offer price their own “perceived value” for things that need repair or maintenance. Repair anything that needs it, replace any fixtures that look dated and clean like your life depends on it. Elbow grease is cheap and adds tons of value. Remember, buyers are buying their new house not your old one.

 Update the kitchen

This is usually the most important room in the house to a buyer. If they fall in love in the kitchen they will often compromise in other areas on their “must have” list.  Remember fresh clean and bright are always in style. Even if the budget will not allow for big changes clean and clear countertops, add new door knobs on the cabinets and drawers and if possible consider new flooring and countertops.

 Bathrooms are the second most important room in the house

If you have the budget for it, upgrade what you can, at least in the main bath. The same principle of fresh clean and bright applies here too. Consider changing the old cabinet-style sink for a pedestal or furniture sink and remember storage is vital. Make sure linen storage is organized and accessible.

Make bedrooms neutral

Do not assume that a buyer will be able to envision their belongings in your rooms.  Very often they can’t especially when they are faced with strong colours and lots of clutter. You have a five-minute opportunity to get this house sold so if doing some simple fixes in paint colour and or décor will help, it is wise to make the effort.

 It’s NOT Personal

Your plan is to move so pack up the personal stuff before you list. Go through each room and take a moment to remember and then pack the sentimentality away.  What stirs your heart can cloud the judgement of a potential buyer. Remove and store as many personal items as possible including family photos, certificates awards and diplomas.

 Pack it NOW

Get a head start on your move. Start deciding what you want to keep/donate/discard. Pack it up and get it out into a storage space. Your closets and cupboards will look bigger and more organized. Storage space is one of the most frequently requested interior features.

The nose knows!

More and more people are suffering from allergies. Worldwide, sensitization rates to one or more common allergens are approaching 50 per cent.  So it is quite possible that a future buyer will be a sufferer.  Remember when you live in your house you will not be able to smell what others do.  The best option is no smells at all rather than the cloying smell of a chemical air freshener.  Open windows when the season allows, if you have pets, remove them from the property for the duration of the sales process if possible and definitely for showings. Hopefully you have family who will help out with this. A good vacuum cleaner will help remove pollens and dander and you will need to do it often and always prior to a showing.

 Let there be light

Make sure every light bulb is energy efficient and at the highest wattage the fixture will take. Clean all the fixtures for maximum sparkle. Turn on lights before you leave for the showing so every room is bright for the buyers to see.

 Curb appeal

Before a potential buyer will even think about viewing your property they will often drive by it and half of them will do it at night. That means you need to put considerable thought into creating great curb appeal. Never underestimate its power. Curb appeal done well is like gift wrapping on a present. The National Association of Realtors says, “Great curb appeal sells more than half of all houses that go on the market.” Outdoor lighting is important. Light up the porch or entrance way making sure that the address numbers of the house are illuminated and visible. Consider lighting pathways and perhaps a spot light feature of the property like a beautiful tree or the front façade.   Curb appeal includes the outdoor living features on the property too.  This is one of the most undervalued aspects of market preparedness that will add dollars to your bottom line. Ninety five per cent of people surveyed said outdoor living amenities are vital. Outdoor allure also includes balconies, decks and patios.

As a Muskoka Realtor I see many beautiful locations and I know that savvy home and cottage owners  take advantage of these fantastic settings as well. Remember – Give your potential buyer what they don’t know they want, but when they see it they can’t resist. It’s  a great way to help generate offers faster.

Buying Vacant Land in Muskoka

Karen Acton - Buying Vacant Land in MuskokaSearching for vacant land to build a new home or cottage on can be very exciting and even if you are working with a Realtor you are often scouting and exploring on your own. However, as buyers you should be aware that purchasing raw land will require extensive due diligence. Do you know the right land buying questions to ask?

It is entirely possible that the sellers will not even have all the answers, so the onus is on you with the help of your Realtor to investigate the issues thoroughly until you’re confident in making the purchase.

Here are 8 questions to help you make a good decision.

1. Is there a survey of the land?
Raw land in this area, especially large parcels, may have never been surveyed and still have a legal description in chains! When a lot is surveyed by a professional surveyor, you can feel confident in the amount of acreage being sold but without, you may or may not be getting the land you contract for. A topography survey (if available) shows lines at every 1 or 2 feet/meters of elevation change along the site, thus giving you a two-dimensional representation of the site’s slope. Sometimes there is a site plan
or an old building location survey showing the location of structures that may not be there now but will indicate areas that may need special review. Some surveys or plans may also show existing utilities and easements.

2. Are the boundaries clearly and accurately marked?
Ideally, corners of the property lines should be marked on the site however in this area it is not always the case. Larger lots rarely have the corners marked and finding them may be very difficult especially if the seller is not familiar with them. At some time prior to making any offer to purchase firm it is very advisable to be sure exactly what you are purchasing by ensuring that the corners have been identified.

3. Are there any Covenants, Conditions & Restrictions?
Covenants, conditions, and restrictions are common and vary in impact depending on the location, municipality and type. Utility companies reserve rights, known as easements, over land to maintain services, municipalities also do this for access to utilities and roads. Some developments may have restrictive covenants with home size minimums or other requirements. Municipalities may have zoning and planning restrictions.

4. Is the title to the property clear?
Property with a clear title is “worry-free” and far more attractive than property which is encumbered by liens and taxes. If there is a large debt associated with the property it may be hard for the seller to accept a fair offer. When working with a Realtor you will be protected from this becoming an issue by clauses in the agreement. If you are buying privately make sure you cover this with the seller.

5. What has the land been used for in the past?
While we are a rural community and most land being sold in this region has never been used for any kind of manufacturing or industry you will still want to seek disclosure as to what its prior uses have been. For instance, if at one time it was a marina you need to know if there were or are still any underground fuel tanks or if there was a scrap car yard on a portion of the lot (cars now all gone) was there a soil sample done to verify that there has been no oil and gasoline seepage contaminating the land? It is important to know that if you buy land that later turns out to need remediation you will be responsible for the cost.

6. What utilities are available in the area?
Providing utility infrastructure to a site is a significant expense, so it is important to know what is existing, what is available and what you will need to install.
If the land has road access you can very likely expect to have electricity and phone utilities at the road. A few rural locations and most urban ones in the area will have access to natural gas. Cell phone service while getting better almost daily is not always good in all locations. Cable service for TV and internet delivery may not be available. Unless you are in one of the Muskoka towns water and sewer will not be available and well and septic will be required.

7. What are the current taxes on the property?
The seller should know this, but if there is any question you can verify the tax assessment and the current mill rate with the municipal office. Understanding the annual tax amount will be essential in understanding your ongoing holding costs. Of course, if you build on the land, your new taxes will reflect the value of the home and any outbuildings you add.

8. What is the property’s zoning?
Every property is assigned a zoning type. The lot may be zoned for residential or commercial. If it’s residential, you may be limited to a single home – sometimes called dwelling units – or be allowed to build multiple units. Zoning will also tell you other restrictions like how tall a building may be on the lot and how close you can build to a property line. Talk to your local planning department to determine the
property’s zoning if the seller does not know.

When buying vacant land in Muskoka, be sure to get answers to all the important questions as well as cost estimates before you firm up an offer. That way you can be sure to enjoy the land for its intended purpose with no expensive or disappointing surprises. Contact me anytime for assistance in this complex and exciting process.

How to Buy a Muskoka Home While Still in Your Twenties

Karen Acton 20 somethingsI have got to give it to you the millennial generation, you are an educated, tech-savvy group and you typically knows what you want. The last few years I have been noticing that many of you “twenty-somethings” have decided that what you want is to buy your first home.

Of course, there are apps galore on just about everything out there, but swiping right isn’t going to get you into your first home – though it probably will help you locate the ones you want to see!

For a more realistic and practical approach however, these five time-tested tips may work better for you.

Are Your Ready to Commit

It has likely been said more than any other piece of home-buying advice out there… Buying a home may be the largest and most important purchase you’ll make in your entire life. You need to know you’re ready for that type of commitment. Millennials have been deemed a nomadic bunch – so, it’s important to note that most home buyers stay in their homes for at least five years – and, that’s just so they can recoup the costs of their purchase.

Buying a home also means you must be ready to get your hands dirty. Handy work like replacing smoke alarm batteries, maintaining landscaping and even changing air filters typically falls in a homeowner’s hands not to mention painting and decorating.

If you can commit to this then you just might be ready!

Understand Your Finances

When it comes to buying a home, a mortgage broker will consider every part of your financial picture. From your current income to your bills and spending habits to the savings you have for your down payment. Since a lender is going to have to verify your finances its good that you know exactly what they will find before they get there. Find out how much money you have coming in and going out and how much you will be able to devote to a monthly mortgage payment.

When you’re considering your finances and budget, also consider the fact that homeownership expenses do not end with the monthly mortgage payment. Home owners are responsible for insurance, property taxes, utilities and any money it costs to cover routine maintenance or unexpected home repairs.

Consider Credit and Savings

Your first brush with credit may have been when you were inundated with credit card offers on your first day of college classes. By now you have probably established some type of credit – and, hopefully it is good. Lenders will consider your credit score when it comes to mortgage approval. Remember – the better your credit score, the better interest rate you’ll be offered. You can improve this score by making sure you carry small or no balance on your cards and pay them on time every month.

In addition to your credit a lender need to see your savings. When you’re buying a home, you’ll need to have money available for the down payment as sufficient to cover closing costs.

Have you saved the money you’ll need when it comes time to buy?

Get Preapproved

I am sure you can see that buying a home is largely a financial process, so it only makes sense that the mortgage process may be a long one, right? So, before you start to look at possible homes it is wise to seek out several lending institutions. They will compete for your business if you have got all your affairs in order, so you can shop around and settle on the one you’d like to use.

Just like every buyer is different, so is every lender. Some may be more lenient when it comes to credit history. Some credit unions or banks if you are a current customer may offer lower rates than other lenders.

Consider all options before choosing a mortgage lender.

Work with Realtor You Trust

The ever-important last piece of the home-buying puzzle. This is one area where I would not advise following a DIY mentality. Professional real estate sales representatives have the training and know-how to lead any first-time home buyer to a home that’s right for them. A trusted Realtor will help you make up your “needs and wants” list when it comes to a home; they will help you consider your long-term goals for your new home; and, they will search for homes, show you homes, negotiate and walk you through the entire offer and closing process… right down to the point where those new home keys fall into your hands.

There will be plenty of DYI to do once you own your new home, especially when it is your first time, a guide through the process only makes good sense. Let me be your guide!

To see current listings in Muskoka click here