Buying Vacant Land in Muskoka

Karen Acton - Buying Vacant Land in MuskokaSearching for vacant land to build a new home or cottage on can be very exciting and even if you are working with a Realtor you are often scouting and exploring on your own. However, as buyers you should be aware that purchasing raw land will require extensive due diligence. Do you know the right land buying questions to ask?

It is entirely possible that the sellers will not even have all the answers, so the onus is on you with the help of your Realtor to investigate the issues thoroughly until you’re confident in making the purchase.

Here are 8 questions to help you make a good decision.

1. Is there a survey of the land?
Raw land in this area, especially large parcels, may have never been surveyed and still have a legal description in chains! When a lot is surveyed by a professional surveyor, you can feel confident in the amount of acreage being sold but without, you may or may not be getting the land you contract for. A topography survey (if available) shows lines at every 1 or 2 feet/meters of elevation change along the site, thus giving you a two-dimensional representation of the site’s slope. Sometimes there is a site plan
or an old building location survey showing the location of structures that may not be there now but will indicate areas that may need special review. Some surveys or plans may also show existing utilities and easements.

2. Are the boundaries clearly and accurately marked?
Ideally, corners of the property lines should be marked on the site however in this area it is not always the case. Larger lots rarely have the corners marked and finding them may be very difficult especially if the seller is not familiar with them. At some time prior to making any offer to purchase firm it is very advisable to be sure exactly what you are purchasing by ensuring that the corners have been identified.

3. Are there any Covenants, Conditions & Restrictions?
Covenants, conditions, and restrictions are common and vary in impact depending on the location, municipality and type. Utility companies reserve rights, known as easements, over land to maintain services, municipalities also do this for access to utilities and roads. Some developments may have restrictive covenants with home size minimums or other requirements. Municipalities may have zoning and planning restrictions.

4. Is the title to the property clear?
Property with a clear title is “worry-free” and far more attractive than property which is encumbered by liens and taxes. If there is a large debt associated with the property it may be hard for the seller to accept a fair offer. When working with a Realtor you will be protected from this becoming an issue by clauses in the agreement. If you are buying privately make sure you cover this with the seller.

5. What has the land been used for in the past?
While we are a rural community and most land being sold in this region has never been used for any kind of manufacturing or industry you will still want to seek disclosure as to what its prior uses have been. For instance, if at one time it was a marina you need to know if there were or are still any underground fuel tanks or if there was a scrap car yard on a portion of the lot (cars now all gone) was there a soil sample done to verify that there has been no oil and gasoline seepage contaminating the land? It is important to know that if you buy land that later turns out to need remediation you will be responsible for the cost.

6. What utilities are available in the area?
Providing utility infrastructure to a site is a significant expense, so it is important to know what is existing, what is available and what you will need to install.
If the land has road access you can very likely expect to have electricity and phone utilities at the road. A few rural locations and most urban ones in the area will have access to natural gas. Cell phone service while getting better almost daily is not always good in all locations. Cable service for TV and internet delivery may not be available. Unless you are in one of the Muskoka towns water and sewer will not be available and well and septic will be required.

7. What are the current taxes on the property?
The seller should know this, but if there is any question you can verify the tax assessment and the current mill rate with the municipal office. Understanding the annual tax amount will be essential in understanding your ongoing holding costs. Of course, if you build on the land, your new taxes will reflect the value of the home and any outbuildings you add.

8. What is the property’s zoning?
Every property is assigned a zoning type. The lot may be zoned for residential or commercial. If it’s residential, you may be limited to a single home – sometimes called dwelling units – or be allowed to build multiple units. Zoning will also tell you other restrictions like how tall a building may be on the lot and how close you can build to a property line. Talk to your local planning department to determine the
property’s zoning if the seller does not know.

When buying vacant land in Muskoka, be sure to get answers to all the important questions as well as cost estimates before you firm up an offer. That way you can be sure to enjoy the land for its intended purpose with no expensive or disappointing surprises. Contact me anytime for assistance in this complex and exciting process.


How to Buy a Muskoka Home While Still in Your Twenties

Karen Acton 20 somethingsI have got to give it to you the millennial generation, you are an educated, tech-savvy group and you typically knows what you want. The last few years I have been noticing that many of you “twenty-somethings” have decided that what you want is to buy your first home.

Of course, there are apps galore on just about everything out there, but swiping right isn’t going to get you into your first home – though it probably will help you locate the ones you want to see!

For a more realistic and practical approach however, these five time-tested tips may work better for you.

Are Your Ready to Commit

It has likely been said more than any other piece of home-buying advice out there… Buying a home may be the largest and most important purchase you’ll make in your entire life. You need to know you’re ready for that type of commitment. Millennials have been deemed a nomadic bunch – so, it’s important to note that most home buyers stay in their homes for at least five years – and, that’s just so they can recoup the costs of their purchase.

Buying a home also means you must be ready to get your hands dirty. Handy work like replacing smoke alarm batteries, maintaining landscaping and even changing air filters typically falls in a homeowner’s hands not to mention painting and decorating.

If you can commit to this then you just might be ready!

Understand Your Finances

When it comes to buying a home, a mortgage broker will consider every part of your financial picture. From your current income to your bills and spending habits to the savings you have for your down payment. Since a lender is going to have to verify your finances its good that you know exactly what they will find before they get there. Find out how much money you have coming in and going out and how much you will be able to devote to a monthly mortgage payment.

When you’re considering your finances and budget, also consider the fact that homeownership expenses do not end with the monthly mortgage payment. Home owners are responsible for insurance, property taxes, utilities and any money it costs to cover routine maintenance or unexpected home repairs.

Consider Credit and Savings

Your first brush with credit may have been when you were inundated with credit card offers on your first day of college classes. By now you have probably established some type of credit – and, hopefully it is good. Lenders will consider your credit score when it comes to mortgage approval. Remember – the better your credit score, the better interest rate you’ll be offered. You can improve this score by making sure you carry small or no balance on your cards and pay them on time every month.

In addition to your credit a lender need to see your savings. When you’re buying a home, you’ll need to have money available for the down payment as sufficient to cover closing costs.

Have you saved the money you’ll need when it comes time to buy?

Get Preapproved

I am sure you can see that buying a home is largely a financial process, so it only makes sense that the mortgage process may be a long one, right? So, before you start to look at possible homes it is wise to seek out several lending institutions. They will compete for your business if you have got all your affairs in order, so you can shop around and settle on the one you’d like to use.

Just like every buyer is different, so is every lender. Some may be more lenient when it comes to credit history. Some credit unions or banks if you are a current customer may offer lower rates than other lenders.

Consider all options before choosing a mortgage lender.

Work with Realtor You Trust

The ever-important last piece of the home-buying puzzle. This is one area where I would not advise following a DIY mentality. Professional real estate sales representatives have the training and know-how to lead any first-time home buyer to a home that’s right for them. A trusted Realtor will help you make up your “needs and wants” list when it comes to a home; they will help you consider your long-term goals for your new home; and, they will search for homes, show you homes, negotiate and walk you through the entire offer and closing process… right down to the point where those new home keys fall into your hands.

There will be plenty of DYI to do once you own your new home, especially when it is your first time, a guide through the process only makes good sense. Let me be your guide!

To see current listings in Muskoka click here

5 Tips to Make Your Plan to Buy a Muskoka Home a Reality

pexels-photo-461024.jpegDid you start your New Year off with a plan to buy a Muskoka home? Well here are some tips to help you whip your financial resume into shape to improve your home-buying odds.

1. Keep your employment stable
Your employment history and income are the two biggest factors most bankers and mortgage brokers are going to look at once they have verified your deposit. While a new job may be a great career move and very exciting prospect it is not what they will want to see on an application. This is especially relevant if you are changing career paths completely. A mortgage lender wants to see stability and if you plan to buy in 2018 you should consider this before accepting a new opportunity. A steady job history and few or no gaps in employment over the past two years are ideal as it helps lenders more easily
forecast your future income.

There are times when it can be beneficial. If you’re moving from a commissioned or hourly job to one that is salaried with equal or more compensation, it may help your application, as banks tend to prefer applicants with steady, predictable incomes.

If you do get a new job while home shopping, let your bank or broker know as soon as possible. It doesn’t mean you won’t qualify for the mortgage, but you are much better off being transparent than having them find out and not advance funds at closing.

2. Keep tabs on your monthly spending
Credit cards are almost a necessity in building a credit rating but keep the maximums low. Even if you pay off your credit card every month, you could be flagged for high credit utilization if your credit report is pulled mid-cycle. In addition, if the available balances are high then many banks will factor that into their calculation when working out the amount of debt you can service.

Monthly subscription services are very common now and are certainly convenient, but they can add up and affect your qualifying ratios.
3. Build yourself a solid credit history
One of the first things a lender will look at is your credit history which is different from the credit score. A bank or broker is going to want to see that you have a history of paying off debts, like credit cards, on time because it signals that you’re less of a risk and a responsible borrower.

If you don’t have credit, securing a home loan may be significantly more challenging and maybe even impossible or very expensive.

4. Monitor your credit score
Your overall credit score can have a significant impact on your ability to buy a home. A low credit score can negatively affect how much money a lender is willing to loan you, as well as your interest rate.

Just a few percentage points difference in an interest rate can cost you thousands over the life of a mortgage. Monitor your credit closely, especially for fraudulent activity, to prevent any surprises that could delay the loan application process. There are many services available that are both free and subscription that can be used to see your score. Most of these sites give tips on how to improve it too, but remember the very best way is to pay on time and in full.

5. Save your money!
Avoid taking on large new debts — whether it’s buying a car or planning a large vacation consider waiting, even if you’re already preapproved.

Your debt-to- income ratio, or how much money you make compared to how much debt you have, can significantly affect how much money a lender is willing to give you. Keeping debts to a minimum can help make the home-buying process go a lot more smoothly.

Just like proofreading your resume before you apply for a job, improving your financial resume can help better your chances of buying a home.

Take advantage of online tools and resources. Speak with a bank or mortgage broker who can help you determine how much home you can afford. Find a Realtor who will guide you through the process and be willing to take the time needed to do it right. Remember that often the difference between a good credit profile and a bad one if just a few moths of personal discipline and the reward will be fulfilling your dream to own your own home.

Enjoy the Holidays Without Spending the Down Payment for your Muskoka Home!

Gifts - Karen ActonHave you been saving like crazy to buy your first Muskoka Home or Cottage?  As a Realtor, I often see buyers, diligently putting as much away as they can, hoping to be able to buy that special fist home only to get their saving hopes hijacked with the holidays and the inevitable gift buying season!

It is easy for this time of year to make a dent in of anyone’s savings my own included. So, I have done my usual google research and complied a listed of good spending habits to help me enjoy the holiday season while staying on a budget and I think it will help you too.

Understandably each person’s budget may look different, and what might work for me may not work for you. So here are some tips to help you survive the holidays without blowing your budget. You can use them all or just one or two.

Have a realistic holiday budget

Determine how much you can afford to spend during the holidays. It is best to create a realistic budget for yourself. Record and add up all the projected costs of your holiday events, gifts, decorations, travel and anything else you can think of.

Then you need to look at the cash you actually will have available for the holiday season. Since you don’t want to go into debt or blow you budget, you want to make sure that you’ll have enough money for all your holiday expenses. If the budgeted expenses are greater than the actual expected income you need to adjust the budget. This may mean taking a hard look and deciding where can cut back.

The idea is to trim your holiday expenses until you have a budget that is easy to manage and will prevent you from getting into debt.

Shop early and shop sales

Planning your gift list in advance will give you the chance to watch and see when these items go on sale either in the local stores or on-line.  Shopping early also ensures that you have the best selection, since items can sell out closer to Christmas.

Check the many websites

Sometimes the best shopping deals can be found online. While we all love to shop local sometimes you do not have that luxury.  Amazon, E-Bay, Pintrest are all great places to find what you want. Most major stores have order on-line shopping many with pick up in store options. You may want to investigate shopping on the cash back sites like Ebates. Ebates represents over 2,000 online stores, including Amazon, it’s easy to save money and get cashback on your online purchases.

Compare prices in store and online

Sometimes you can find special promotions happening online only.  Some of the bigger online retailers have lots of special offers and offer memberships that get you free shipping so if you are buying a lot from that source a membership may be a good investment.

Not all gifts cost money

If your holiday budget is tight or you want to buy a gift for the person who already has everything, consider giving the gift of time or experience this year. Life is about relationships and giving the gift of time allows you to invest and nurture those relationships. You could cook a meal or two, decorate their tree, take care of their children while they shop or go on a date. There are so many options, and all will be appreciated.

Consider a gift exchange

If you have a large group of friends or family, it can get very expensive buying gifts for everyone, especially if money is tight. I recommend suggesting a gift exchange or secret Santa where you draw names. This way everyone can receive a nice gift, which is probably more thoughtful, and saves everyone a lot of money.


I know many people who are starting to boycott gifts during the holidays. This is not just to save money but often a way of getting back to the real meaning of the holiday season. Of focusing on spending time together being thankful rather than stressed. There’s no shame in letting others know that you won’t be participating in gift exchanges this year because you’re saving up for a down payment or one of your other financial goals.

In fact, people are probably experiencing a similar financial situation and will be thankful that you started the conservation. It’s important to set expectations though for family and friends if you choose to boycott gifts this year. And remember that the true meaning of Christmas is not about gifts.

Last years dress will do!

We all feel the pressure to buy a new outfit for each holiday event or party that you need to attend. Buying a new outfit feels good and we think we cannot be seen wearing the same thing as last year. However, it is simply not important. While a few people may remember what you wore last year it is not important. Your friends will be far happier to see you than what you are wearing.

Plan for each holiday event you wish to attend

It’s important to make a list of all the holiday events you plan on attending and include them in the budget. Whether it’s a family gathering or a fancy work party, each event has the potential to cost you money.

Consider how far you need to travel and the cost of fuel and perhaps accommodations, food or drink that you need to contribute, host/hostess gifts and any other hard cost. This will allow you to determine how much money you need to set aside to attend each event, so you can stay on budget.

The Holiday Season is a wonderful time filled with fun, family and social activities but it is wise to not let is take control of your plans. After all the holidays are a few days long and the home you are saving for will be yours for many years.

Planning a New Kitchen in Your Muskoka Home?

Sargeant49 important questions before you start

We all want a dream kitchen so before you start here are some tips experts have developed to help you get one. Start with a clear view of what you intend. Focus on the things you want and those you need. This will help you see where you can compromise if necessary and where to stick to your goals.

A kitchen renovation can seem overwhelming when you start the process. There are lots of elements to get right. It is not simply the design but all the other factors from appliances to how will it fit the style and décor of the rest of your home or cottage.

1.Define the vision. Ask the big questions before you do anything. You need to establish how you want your kitchen to function. Do you have a large family and want your new kitchen to be the place where you all spend time, eat meals do home work? Do you love to entertain and envision a stunning space to show off your culinary skills? Ask yourself some clear questions to help build your vision, do you love to cook or is it a necessary function? Will you need a desk or work space here?
By asking yourself questions before you start making decisions you identify exactly what you want and what you need out of your available space. By knowing what you want at the beginning you are less likely to get off track once you have started.

2.What are my needs? After you’ve defined the vision or theme of your new kitchen, you need to identify the nonnegotiable things that are at the top of your wants and needs list. Your needs are the things you cannot do without. Things like an eating area or a large window – the important things that will control your joy level when being in the new kitchen. Don’t over focus on things that will go out of fashion over time like paint colours or even appliances as they can all be changed. Hopefully, you won’t need to make compromises on these needed items.

3. Making a compromise or two. Once you have defined the vision and made sure the needs are in place it is time to look at your want list and perhaps some of the compromises that may be required. You may want a new gas range but it is not in the budget! The solution is simple, make sure the space for the dream stove is created now but buy it next year and use your existing one for now. Some compromises are a bit harder to make. You may have wanted a feature that the space available simply cannot accommodate and that is a tougher compromise to come to terms with.

4.Creating an efficient layout? The layout of your kitchen is a big decision, and you may need professional advice. It is best to sketch it carefully and note where the gas and electrical outlets are going to be for each appliance, and of course drainage for plumbed items. Kitchen designers like to create zones for cooking, washing and prepping which is a great tip for creating good flow.

Consider the space between cooktops and windows or tower cabinets, and between electrical outlets and sinks. Think about which appliances can sit near others, and remember to make sure doors can open safely. Don’t put islands too close to a run of cabinets as you will want to be sure to have a comfortable walkway. Many cabinet retailers will have software that can draw a plan for you and some will even visit your home or cottage to measure and check the positions of things.

5.Don’t forget the lighting and heating? It is very important that while you are still in the planning stage you consider the accompanying elements of your new kitchen design. The lighting and heating are important and it is vital to get it right, not only to create a welcoming atmosphere, but also to see clearly while you’re cooking! Decide whether you need direct lighting over the work surfaces and pot lights in the ceiling. Lighting has come a long way and there are some very glamorous options that can have a significant impact without a huge cost.

The heating system is like the kitchen cabinets and appliances, it’s best to decide on positions for these at the outset so that you can get services installed at the correct locations before the kitchen goes in. Once you’ve decided on the layout of your heating and lighting, as well as the position of your appliances and cabinets, try not to make any huge changes as it can be costly to reposition or divert your utilities once you’re at the installation stage.

6.Don’t forget about building permits? If you’re having structural, electrical or plumbing work done as part of the job, you may need to obtain a building permit before you start work. If you’re undertaking this level of work you may have an architect or a building contractor who will be able to tell you how to go about applying for the right sort of permission for the job.

7.What’s my style?Once you have determined all the practical aspects of your reno you can start to think about the fun stuff! You most likely have browsed the internet or the pages of decorating magazines but now with your vision, wants and needs list you can zoom in on the final “look” you want. Perhaps it’s a farmhouse kitchen with a huge harvest table or perhaps a sleek minimalist block with hidden appliances? Whatever you seek, with careful planning you should be able to achieve it and  stay within budget.

8.Hiring a contractor? Perhaps the weightiest decision you will have to make when undertaking a kitchen reno, is choosing the right people to do the work. Many builders will be happy to take on your whole project, with responsibility for the building work, cabinetry, electrical and plumbing considerations too. However, if you are not making any structural changes you may not need a building contractor. You can act as your own general contractor and coordinate the tradesmen you need to do your project. You may need to employ a cabinetmaker, a certified plumber or electrician, tilers and drywall and plaster experts as well as flooring and heating trades. Remember to ask for estimates and get references.

9.Choosing the finishes. Before the work has started finalize as many things as possible like sinks and faucets, countertops, and appliances as well as the tile and flooring. Don’t wait until your contractor needs the items and you rush to obtain them, rather get ahead of the time line so that you won’t be rushed at installation stage. This will ensure that you do not make snap decisions that you may later regret.

These 9 steps are a great guide to a successful kitchen renovation. No matter the reason for the reno, getting it right will bring you a great deal of pleasure and add value to your Muskoka home or cottage.

Net Zero Homes and Muskoka

Net-Zero-highres Image

Net Zero Home by Reids Heritage Homes in Guelph Ontario.

In May 2017, the Canadian Home Builders’ Association (CHBA) officially launched the Net Zero Home Labelling Program, which is focused on building fully energy efficient communities.

Kevin Lee, CEO of CHBA said “The Net Zero Home Label will help to meet the energy efficient housing aspirations of Canadians, and renew Canadian industry leadership in high performance housing. CHBA members have always been leaders and innovators – this program continues that trend.” He went on to say “Our National Home Buyer Preference Study confirmed that consumers want and expect an energy efficient home. Our members have a long history in delivering high performance homes and are ready and eager to deliver the next generation of high performance housing to discerning Canadian home buyers. Our Net Zero Home Labelling Program provides third party confirmation for both the industry and the consumer.”

According to the CMHC web site a Net Zero Home (NZE) is one that is designed and built to reduce household energy needs to a minimum and includes on-site (not all definitions require on-site but CMHC does) renewable energy systems, so that the house may produce as much energy as it consumes on a yearly basis.

According to the CMHC a Net Zero home is not necessarily an “energy autonomous” one. It does not have to be “off-grid” and can be connected to electrical service. This is so that it can supply electricity to the grid when it is producing more than it needs and draw from the grid when household demands exceed the amount of electricity produced on site.  The NZE designation is about the net annual consumption of energy being zero.  The intention is that  over the course of a year, the energy supplied to the grid balances the energy drawn from the grid, therefore giving a  net- zero annual energy consumption.

Kevin Lee said that the CHBA is “ showing support for leading-edge innovation in the residential construction industry that with the goal of having those innovations as a voluntary and affordable choice for consumers,”  CHBA feels that the Program benefits builders and buyers by clearly defining the two-tier requirements for Net Zero and Net Zero Ready Homes. It also identifies the builders and renovators who provide Net Zero services.

So what do the designation actually mean?   Most of us are familiar with the ENERGY STAR designation which indicates that the home is 20% more energy efficient than the Building Code requires. A Net Zero Ready home will have to be up to 80% more efficient than code, and a Net Zero home will be 100% more efficient than code requirements.  The reason a Net Zero home is 100% more efficient is because it produces as much energy as it consumes.

Special training has been developed for members of the building and land development industry who are interested in achieving Net Zero. There are CHBA Net Zero Qualified Service organizations, energy advisors, and trainers that will work with builders and renovators to plan their next Net Zero project.

It’s becoming increasingly important to build and market energy efficient homes and communities. The CHBA conducted a nationwide home buyer preference study and discovered that four out of the top 10 ‘must have’ features in a new home were energy efficiency related.

So where in Muskoka can you find a Net Zero home you may ask. Well as far as I can tell nowhere yet! But because Muskoka, by its very nature, attracts people who desire to give more than they take I believe this is something we will be seeing more and more of. Builders like Mattamy Homes and Reid’s Heritage Homes are already offering Net Zero options in their developments.  Many more custom builders in our region are taking the required training to be able to offer this option to their clients. So, if you are planning to build a home or cottage in this area ask you architect and builder about Net Zero construction.

The Upside to Downsizing Your Muskoka Home

DownsizeYour children are grown and finally gone and settled into their own adult lives. You have gone through the woes of “empty nest” syndrome and you are now in the position to think about what is next for you!

Do you keep the big home and hope that you get to host the family holidays? Do you even want to do that?  Most of us eventually decide that a smaller home with less maintenance and overhead is the wiser thing to do, so here are some pros and cons to help you decide if there is an upside to downsizing for you.

Most often when I see clients downsize, they tend to move into into a smaller home or condo. Smaller homes very often are on smaller lots and both of these options can mean being closer to neighbours.

On the downside you can see and hear your neighbours.  This may be a negative but you can help moderate the effect by upgrading the window treatments in your home for privacy and strategically place screening plants in your garden or on your patio or balcony to make you new location more private.

The upside is you can get to know your neighbours. In most cases when you downsize you will find you have more time on your hands.  Less work to do around the home so having new friends in the neighbourhood is a great way to spend some of that time. Be social, old friends are great, but making friends next door will enhance the everyday enjoyment you have in your new home.

One of the things a larger home often has is storage space that smaller homes and condos usually lack.

On the downside storage becomes a premium. The double vanity in the old bathroom, the large hall closet, the full basement with a large utility room: these places may be gone in the new home. To counter-act this you may want to consider closet organizers and perhaps a bathroom makeover.

The upside is you can purge and then indulge: You may need to be a little brutal with yourself at first but pare down your “stuff” to only the things you need and love. Then give yourself permission to acquire only products you love as time goes on.  They may cost a little more but your new and efficient life style means you can afford to spend a little more on your favourite perfume and toiletries and use them every day rather than having 2 or 3 kinds and keeping the favorite one only for special occasions!

Most large family homes have formal sitting areas and family rooms. Often there is a craft room and a work shop. Lots of “hidey holes” for family members to have “me time” that may not exist in a smaller home.

The downside is that it is harder to have your own space. As a retired empty nester, you may have developed separate interests and activities from your partner so you will need to be intentional about giving each other the time and space needed to continue to do these activities.
The upside is that by being more exposed to your partner’s hobbies you may find you both enjoy them.  In addition, you will have a smaller home and fewer rooms that need cleaning so more time to spend together.

One of the biggest factors to consider when downsizing is what to keep and what to let go of.

The downside is your furniture may no longer work. Even if you’ve made careful decisions about what items you will keep and take to the new home there could be issues. A light-filled room can highlight stains you hadn’t noticed, the color or style may be all wrong for the space, and the way you find yourself using a room may mean that your furniture feels like a mismatch.

The upside is you are liquidating capital in the process and so can afford some new items: You have the perfect excuse to go shopping for new furniture and that is always fun!

The garden is usually a big adjustment whether you love to garden or not. Moving from a large home that likely has a larger garden to a smaller one with just a little one or even a condo with none can mean a big change.

The downside is your backyard shrinks, and your lifestyle changes along with it. For many this is a relief not a problem but if gardening is a passion for you, the solution is not as hard as you may think. There are often neighbours who can no longer manage their gardens who would love to allow you to help. Put a message on the community Facebook page and see how many replies you get. If you’re used to lazing by a back-yard pool and know you’ll miss it, consider a hot tub or a swim spa instead.

The upside is you have more time for you. Mowing the lawn will no longer be a time-consuming chore and the cost of the spring and fall turn around will be cut down considerably.  Remember, with some creative furnishings and plantings, a compact backyard can still meet your needs for a restful outdoor escape and a place to entertain family and friends.

By the time, you are ready to down size you have very likely been used to a large kitchen and cooking for a family. A smaller home or condo will usually mean a much smaller kitchen.

The downside is a compact kitchen changes the way you cook. When you have had oodles of counter tops and lots of storage perhaps even a pantry, cooking a family meal is relatively easy. A smaller kitchen will require you to clean as you go, plan your meals and shop for ingredients more often. It also means you need to reduce the quantities of serving dishes, glassware and kitchen gadgets that you keep.

The upside is that you can have fun learning new recipes. Embrace your downsized lifestyle and eat out more often. Meet friends out for dinner instead of having them over and when it comes to family events go to their home or make it pot luck and paper plates!

Another adjustment you will likely have to face is that your rooms need to serve more than one purpose. If you had a sewing room in your old home, you will most likely have to set up in a spare bedroom and pack things up for company.

The downside is rooms must serve more than one purpose. As an empty nester, you will have had the luxury of turning rooms the children once occupied into craft rooms, man caves, home offices and the like. When you downsize you will need to adjust to multipurpose rooms and make do, particularly when hosting guests.

The upside is less space less junk. You will be less tempted to accumulate stuff and buy only what you need or genuinely love.

Laundry rooms are often sacrificed in a downsizing move. Laundry rooms become laundry areas and in a condo may even be a community facility.

The downside is you need to plan your laundry day. If your kitchen and laundry become one or you need to leave your home to do laundry, figuring out what to do with baskets of washing can be a challenge. The typical laundry room is a prime dumping ground for all manner of items, such as shoes that need cleaning and stained items that are soaking in the sink, ironing board and so much more. You must find a way to eliminate this or “hide” it until laundry day.
The upside is small loads of laundry done frequently: Piles of laundry will become a thing of the past. Staying on top of washing, folding and ironing will become the norm.

Perhaps the biggest change and even the most difficult one to adjust to is how to handle house guests.

The downside is you have to plan well for company. Larger homes often come with guest rooms for visiting family but downsizing means you need to get creative to squeeze in more than one guest at a time. Bunk beds, wall beds, sofa beds and air mattresses are all options. It’s up to you how many guests you want to accommodate at once —and sometimes it will take a visit or two to see what will work.

The upside is smaller groups of visitors means more one-on-one time with them: If only a couple of family members can visit comfortably at once, quality time together is assured.

The decision to go from a large family home to a smaller one is not easy to make, but in my experience it is usually a good move with no regrets. I would be happy to help you with any questions you may have about the process and, of course, with the search for that new smaller abode.